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WALLY OLINS ON BRAND PDF

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Wally Olins on Brand [Wally Olins] on myavr.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Brands are a cultural phenomenon of our time. Yet, whether praised or. Celebrating the life of Wally Olins: Leading corporate identity exponent and prominent brand proponent (CORPORATE BRAND) JOURNAL OF BRAND. PDF | The role of WALLY OLINS () vis-à-vis corporate and organisational memory, JOURNAL OF BRAND MANAGEMENT ().


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Wally Olins. Viewpoints. Corporate By Wally Olins. Executive summary: . The final customer identifies with the brand and other audiences the corporation. Wally Olins - Despre Brand - Download as PDF File .pdf) or read online. Branding. Wally Olins (–), corporate identity ascendancy and corporate brand hegemony. Celebrating the life of Wally Olins: Leading corporate identity exponent.

The company's behaviour patterns, its communications and the appearance of its products, services, offices and showrooms, are a result of the influence of a few people. There comes a time though when this casual, uncultivated identity is no longer appropriate, because the organization has grown very big, or it has taken over other businesses.

Some reasons may be: Merger, diversification, re-organization or other structural, strategic or management change Consistent evidence that the outside world misunderstands and undervalues the corporation, or that there is insufficient internal co-ordination and unity Mixed and contradictory visual and verbal messages emerging from the different parts of the corporate world A need to emphasize and differentiate emotional factors — because the rational competitive factors — price, quality and service are very similar.

Mercedes-Benz and BMW cars are technically very similar but because of the emotional context that has been created around them Mercedes is technology, BMW is fun , people react differently to them. Rational factors are similar in an increasing number of industries, including banking, financial services, oil, chemicals, computers and cars. This makes emotional differentiation increasingly significant Economies of scale and successful corporate identity management can help reduce operating expenses when design systems are developed which can easily be implemented internationally.

As emotional factors become more important in distinguishing between organizations, the corporate vision becomes more significant — who we are, what we do, how we do it, and what we want to become.

The vision helps people to answer related questions: Why should I buy from or work for this company?

France has been Royalist, Republican and Imperial. It has been Egalitarian and Absolutist in turns and occasionally, even at the same time, always with the same vigour, sense of destiny and intellectual conviction which distinguishes the French political and cultural scene. Just a few glimpses at certain points in French history underline the point.

Versailles was erected as the physical embodiment of absolute power. Then came the First and most significant Revolution — The France of the Revolution was a completely different entity from the France of the Bourbons.

Not only was the traditional nobility exiled and dispersed, the Royal Family executed, a Republic proclaimed, religion excoriated, and an entire social and cultural system turned on its head but every little detail changed too. The Tricolour replaced the Fleur de Lys, the Marseillaise became the new anthem, the traditional weights and measures were replaced by the metric system, a new calendar was introduced, God was replaced by the Supreme Being and the whole lot was exported through military triumphs all over Europe.

In other words the entire French package was changed. Only a very few years later another rebranding operation took place. General Bonaparte made himself Emperor. Empire was a concept entirely new and hitherto entirely alien to France. France had been a kingdom and then briefly a republic but France had never had an Emperor before.

Napoleon crowned himself Emperor at his own coronation although he brought the Pope from Rome just to be on hand.

He introduced new titles, rituals, uniforms, honours and decorations, not to speak of a new legal and educational system.

In his rapidly assembled Empire he gave new names to a number of extremely short-lived new countries some of which like Illyria and the Parthenopean Republic sounded very pretty. All this effort was commemorated and memorialised by a number of artists and writers of whom Jacques-Louis David was perhaps the most gifted. And the rebranding of France has proceeded sporadically and often violently ever since. In an attempt to recreate the glory of his uncle, the first and incomparably greater figure, Napoleon III and the Second Empire went down to humiliating defeat by Prussia in The Third Republic as Professor Eric Hobsbawm2 makes clear, wanted to make Republicanism respectable, hence for example, the Bastille Day celebrations initiated in nearly years after the Bastille fell.

Although the Vichy regime is now regarded as a humiliating and shameful period in French history, there is no doubt that it was one might say a new brand with a powerful and for some time popular, political, cultural and social ideology. Each time the reality has been modulated the symbolism has changed with it. And each time France has presented a new version of itself both internally and to the outside world.

The French people and France itself continue to demonstrate many traditional characteristics. Vichy for example presented a face of France which had existed as a powerful minority point of view throughout the life of the Third Republic, and still, unhappily, exists today. Nevertheless the changes are not superficial or cosmetic or meaningless, they are real and profound. The reason why nations continue both explicitly and sometimes implicitly to shape and reshape their identities or if you prefer explicitly and implicitly to rebrand themselves is because their reality changes and they need to project this real change symbolically to all the audiences internal and external with whom they relate.

I cite the example of France in detail both because so distinguished a commentator as Michel Girard insists that France has never been rebranded, and because at least in my judgement, of all the countries in the world, France is probably the one that has been most influential in the branding and rebranding of other nations. But you can make similar observations about almost but not quite every nation. And as all of us in the branding business know, consistency and coherence are what branding is all about.

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Lieven goes on to talk about nascent German nationalism. This put a heavy stress on ethnicity, and above all language, as the essential defining elements in community identity… ethnic nationalism was inherently populist: The combination of French revolutionary nationalism and folksy German romanticism, Jacques-Louis David meets Caspar David Friedrich so to speak, was the starting point for the self-conscious, self-aware nation which emerged throughout the 19th and 20th century.

These new nations or brands usually carved out of old multi- lingual, multi-national empires, or patched together from a variety of fragments ruled by minor princelings used all the powers at their disposal to create a unitary state, with a single or dominant language and a single or dominant religion.

They used universal male military conscription and universal primary education to create a feeling for national identity which could be shared by all those living inside the nation and respected, admired, feared or at the very least acknowledged by its neighbours.

The word Kaiser was deliberately chosen because it appeared to hark back to Charlemagne, the Holy Roman Empire and the Caesars of Roman antiquity. He thought it pretentious, bombastic and bogus. It was of course all of those things but it was certainly symbolic of the new German brand.

And his grandson William II, the one who went to war in loved being a Kaiser.

The newly invented country celebrated a range of newly reinvented myths, folklore and traditions. The France of the Revolution was a completely different entity from the France of the Bourbons.

Wally Olins - The Brand Handbook

Not only was the traditional nobility exiled and dispersed, the Royal Family executed, a Republic proclaimed, religion excoriated, and an entire social and cultural system turned on its head but every little detail changed too. The Tricolour replaced the Fleur de Lys, the Marseillaise became the new anthem, the traditional weights and measures were replaced by the metric system, a new calendar was introduced, God was replaced by the Supreme Being and the whole lot was exported through military triumphs all over Europe.

In other words the entire French package was changed. Only a very few years later another rebranding operation took place. General Bonaparte made himself Emperor. Empire was a concept entirely new and hitherto entirely alien to France. France had been a kingdom and then briefly a republic but France had never had an Emperor before.

Napoleon crowned himself Emperor at his own coronation although he brought the Pope from Rome just to be on hand. He introduced new titles, rituals, uniforms, honours and decorations, not to speak of a new legal and educational system.

In his rapidly assembled Empire he gave new names to a number of extremely short-lived new countries some of which like Illyria and the Parthenopean Republic sounded very pretty. All this effort was commemorated and memorialised by a number of artists and writers of whom Jacques-Louis David was perhaps the most gifted.

And the rebranding of France has proceeded sporadically and often violently ever since. In an attempt to recreate the glory of his uncle, the first and incomparably greater figure, Napoleon III and the Second Empire went down to humiliating defeat by Prussia in The Third Republic as Professor Eric Hobsbawm2 makes clear, wanted to make Republicanism respectable, hence for example, the Bastille Day celebrations initiated in nearly years after the Bastille fell.

Although the Vichy regime is now regarded as a humiliating and shameful period in French history, there is no doubt that it was one might say a new brand with a powerful and for some time popular, political, cultural and social ideology.

Each time the reality has been modulated the symbolism has changed with it. And each time France has presented a new version of itself both internally and to the outside world.

See a Problem?

The French people and France itself continue to demonstrate many traditional characteristics. Vichy for example presented a face of France which had existed as a powerful minority point of view throughout the life of the Third Republic, and still, unhappily, exists today. Nevertheless the changes are not superficial or cosmetic or meaningless, they are real and profound.

The reason why nations continue both explicitly and sometimes implicitly to shape and reshape their identities or if you prefer explicitly and implicitly to rebrand themselves is because their reality changes and they need to project this real change symbolically to all the audiences internal and external with whom they relate. I cite the example of France in detail both because so distinguished a commentator as Michel Girard insists that France has never been rebranded, and because at least in my judgement, of all the countries in the world, France is probably the one that has been most influential in the branding and rebranding of other nations.

But you can make similar observations about almost but not quite every nation. And as all of us in the branding business know, consistency and coherence are what branding is all about. Lieven goes on to talk about nascent German nationalism.

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This put a heavy stress on ethnicity, and above all language, as the essential defining elements in community identity… ethnic nationalism was inherently populist: the true bearer of authentic national culture was a peasantry that had retained its customs, folk music and languages. The combination of French revolutionary nationalism and folksy German romanticism, Jacques-Louis David meets Caspar David Friedrich so to speak, was the starting point for the self-conscious, self-aware nation which emerged throughout the 19th and 20th century.

These new nations or brands usually carved out of old multi- lingual, multi-national empires, or patched together from a variety of fragments ruled by minor princelings used all the powers at their disposal to create a unitary state, with a single or dominant language and a single or dominant religion.

They used universal male military conscription and universal primary education to create a feeling for national identity which could be shared by all those living inside the nation and respected, admired, feared or at the very least acknowledged by its neighbours. The word Kaiser was deliberately chosen because it appeared to hark back to Charlemagne, the Holy Roman Empire and the Caesars of Roman antiquity. He thought it pretentious, bombastic and bogus. It was of course all of those things but it was certainly symbolic of the new German brand.

And his grandson William II, the one who went to war in loved being a Kaiser.ImpactThe award-winning identity system captured the immediate attention, heartsand minds of onlookers and museum lovers.

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There was nothing there before — like Orange the mobile phone business, or Vueling the Spanish low-cost airline, or First Direct the internet bank, perhaps the most famous example, Lexus the luxury car brand. It might be worth showing some examples to prove the point. He introduced new titles, rituals, uniforms, honours and decorations, not to speak of a new legal and educational system. The reason why nations continue both explicitly and sometimes implicitly to shape and reshape their identities or if you prefer explicitly and implicitly to rebrand themselves is because their reality changes and they need to project this real change symbolically to all the audiences internal and external with whom they relate.

The take away: Does your organisation have a clear architecture? The newly invented country celebrated a range of newly reinvented myths, folklore and traditions. Diagrams helped me make sense of, for example, the difference between corporate and monolithic brand structures. Bangladesh has had three names in just over half a century; first it was part of India as East Bengal, then it became East Pakistan and then Bangladesh.

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