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HAMBURGER GOURMET PDF

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The Gourmet Burger Builder has been designed to help students aged to . also be exported as a 'pdf', which they can save (as evidence of their work). trends social life in motion the rise of the gourmet hamburger by mark caldwell. Not all hamburgers are created equal, and given the changes in the U.S. dietary. PDF | 20 minutes read | Consumers' increasing concerns toward nutrition, health, and Also, this pre-cooked hamburger patties are significantly preferred compared to grass-fed patties .. The rise of the gourmet hamburger.


Hamburger Gourmet Pdf

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conceito de hambúrguer gourmet, baseado na customização do hamburger. O cliente portugal/myavr.info INPI. team for a copy or visit: myavr.info for further details. At handmade burger Co. we are obsessed about our burgers, that's why we make them. 2 - CHOOSE YOUR BURGER. Beef. Lamb. Chicken. Veggie. Gluten free buns Available. Gourmet Club. $ Your Burger, Salad, Club Aioli, Relish, + Cheese .

The high production and consumption of beef cattle in the United States made the meat industry increasingly powerful by the end of the 19th century. At the beginning of the 20th century, Upton Sinclair published The Jungle , a novel about conspiracies and corruption in the American meat industry, intended as a veiled criticism of the industry itself. The book raised popular awareness about the safety of meat processing and helped lead to the creation of the Pure Food and Drug Act , which was sponsored by the Food and Drug Administration.

The Jungle was a milestone in the subsequent history of the hamburger, as it led the American public to force restaurant chains to prove the safety of their cooked meat.

Controversial origins[ edit ] The Big Mac popularized an evolution in the image of the hamburger. The exact origin of the hamburger may never be known with any certainty. Most historians believe that it was invented by a cook who placed a Hamburg steak between two slices of bread in a small town in Texas, and others credit the founder of White Castle for developing the "Hamburger Sandwich.

Despite varieties, there are common elements in all of the narratives, most notably that the hamburger was born as a food associated with major events such as amusement parks , fairs , conferences , and festivals. All the hypotheses also share the presence of street vendors. Legend has it that during the course of the Fair, the Menches ran out of their signature menu item of pork sausage sandwiches. Their local supplier, Hamburg butcher Andrew Klein, was reluctant to butcher more hogs during a period of unseasonable late summer heat and suggested to substitute the use of ground beef.

The brothers fired some up, but both found it dry and bland.

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They added coffee, brown sugar and other ingredients to create a unique taste. The original sandwiches were sold with just ketchup and sliced onions. In the s, carnival historian John C. One of the possible fathers of the hamburger is Charlie Nagreen — of Seymour, Wisconsin , who at the age of 15 sold Hamburg steaks from a street stall at the annual Outagamie County Fair.

Nagreen said he began by selling Hamburg steaks, but these did not have much success because people wanted to freely move around the festival without the need to eat them at his stand. In response to this, in Nagreen decided to flatten the hamburger steak and insert it between two slices of bread, so that the public could move freely from booth to booth while eating his sandwich, an innovation that was well received by his customers.

To this day, his accomplishment is celebrated annually with a "Burger Fest" in his honor in his hometown of Seymour. Another alleged inventor of the hamburger is the cook Fletcher Davis better known as "Old Dave" , who claimed to have had the idea of putting ground beef between two pieces of Texas Toast when one of his customers was in too much of a hurry to sit down for a meal. The customer walked away with his Hamburger Steak and seemed so content that Old Dave offered his new carryout meal as a staple menu item at the end of in Athens, Texas.

Fletcher had a stall with his wife at the St.

Louis World's Fair of Texan journalist Frank X. During the s, the Dairy Queen ice cream chain filmed a documentary about the birthplace of the hamburger featuring Davis' story. McDonald's book The Complete Hamburger.

This statement has been very poorly documented or substantiated, and in the case of an oral tradition, it is not without its contradictions. Another version of the creation of the hamburger is that of German cook Otto Kuasw, who created a very popular sailors' sandwich made of a fillet of beef patty fried in butter, served with a fried egg , between two toasted buns in , at a post in Hamburg , Germany.

The sandwich was called the "Deutsches Beefsteak", German for "German beefsteak". Many of the sailors traveling on ships between Hamburg and New York requested a similar "Hamburg style" sandwich at American steakhouses.

There are many additional claims as to the origin of the hamburger. A local newspaper claims that Louis Lassen, a Danish immigrant who arrived in America in , sold butter and eggs as a street vendor. In , in an interview with The New York Times , he recounted how he created a hamburger steak sandwich with small strips of beef for a restaurant known as Louis' Lunch.

Lassen's family claims as the year of his invention. Revealed in a public confrontation between the grandson of Louis, Kenneth Davis Lassen Fletch, and his uncle, documentation signed under notary in demonstrates the development of the hamburger, as it stresses the difference between a "hamburger steak" and a "hamburger sandwich". Louis, Missouri in The stoves use hinged steel wire gridirons to hold the hamburgers in place while they cook simultaneously on both sides.

The gridirons were made by Luigi Pieragostini and patented in One of these accompaniments, which is still common with today's burger, is ketchup , a type of tomato sauce with a blend of flavors between sweet and sour that was first produced commercially in by entrepreneur and chef Henry John Heinz in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania.

It is possible that after the creation of the hamburger by uniting the steak with the bread, vegetables were included to give the finished product a more "natural" appearance and taste. The people of this region used to prepare meals with small amounts of fried fish , but when the river froze over and fishing became impossible, they would cut up potatoes and fry them in animal oil.

The improvements in potato freezing technology made by J. Simplot of Idaho City in , made the large scale production of French fries possible. Before the potatoes were frozen, however, they had still lost some of their flavor during frying, but new processes such as a further improved Simplot invention avoided this inconvenience by , largely thanks to the use of a mixture of cow tallow and soybean oil. Initially, however, there were safety concerns raised over some fries and the kitchens in which they were prepared, leading some companies, such as White Castle , to remove them from their menus during the s.

In the late 19th century, it was sold as a bottled soft drink in most of the United States. In the early 20th century, another beverage, Pepsi , was created by pharmacist Caleb Bradham and quickly came to rival the sales of Coca-Cola.

Strategic alliances between large burger restaurant chains and these two soft drink companies greatly increased the beverages' availability to the general public. Commercialization[ edit ] The hamburger solved the technical problem of mass-producing semi-processed food.

The dawn of the 20th century witnessed the need to provide food for people living in highly productive urban centers with high population densities. Food also had to be economically affordable for the working class in order for them to maintain their labor and industrial production.

The burger was born in a time when people needed to eat both "fast" and "cheap".

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The socio-economic environment of the United States at the time of the burger's rise to popularity coincided with the end of World War I and the beginning of the Great Depression of This environment was particularly favorable for fostering inexpensive food, which was one reason why five-cent hamburgers were so popular. After its invention during the first decade of the 20th century, the hamburger came to be marketed on a large scale, after "visionaries" realized that it would benefit greatly from a mass production process.

The widespread appearance of telephones occurred at the beginning of the 20th century, along with other modern means of communication, including radio. For the average American who had not eaten in a restaurant in his or her entire life, [54] the fast food chains that appeared in the cities offered an alternative form of restaurant in which eating was very much a public activity.

The concept of a " greasy spoon " was thus born with these restaurants[ citation needed ], in which hygiene suffered in exchange for more inexpensive food. On the other hand, there was a growing interconnected world in which trips by car, bus, and rail became increasingly available. All these means of transport were improving at the time, and soon it was necessary to feed a growing population that was "in permanent transit", frequently moving through different cities on business.

Similarly, the English immigrant Frederick Henry Harvey was the first to use "dynamic mass movement" in restoring the Fred Harvey Company , which catered to the patrons of a chain of hotels located near railway stations, as well as offering catering, services, and high quality products on the trains themselves.

For example, German immigrant Charles Feltman invented the hot dog in in his stall in Coney Island , New York by pairing a frankfurter with a bread bun. Similarly, Italian immigrants sold ice cream from vending carts in the streets or pasta at their restaurants. Chinese immigrants initially opened restaurants to cater to their fellow Chinese-Americans, but they gradually became accepted by the American clientele, sometimes resulting in truly Chinese-American cuisine such as chop suey.

In this diverse world of ethnic foods, the hamburger was able to rise to mainstream popularity and become a national food of the United States.

At this time, the hamburger was still not widely known by the American public. Anderson added onion rings to the burgers while they grilled, giving them a distinctive flavor. Despite some growth, Anderson had opened only four stands in the busiest areas of the city. The restaurant was founded on the idea of cooking a hamburger quickly, giving it the honor of being the first fast food restaurant. Ingram soon realized that the word burger evoked connotations of circus performances at livestock markets and greasy pieces of meat eaten in the poorest districts of the city in the collective mind of the American public.

He tried to change those connotations from White Castle's earliest days. At the same time, he became known to some as the Henry Ford of the hamburger, [26] while inventing a restaurant concept he called the "White Castle System", which helped the hamburger achieve fame.

In order to raise awareness among White Castle employees, a newsletter entitled "The hot hamburger" was circulated throughout the company, which challenged the employees to improve the sale of the burgers with a simple idea: to be able to prepare burgers rapidly so anyone could purchase and eat them anytime and anywhere.

Instead of waiting for half an hour to be served at a traditional restaurant, the White Castle System provided rapid service and a menu centered around the hamburger.

At the time, the hamburger was typically served with coffee. In addition to offering clean and safe food, White Castle offered regularity and standardization, ensuring that each patty was served in the same manner in each restaurant. At the time, this was an entirely novel idea that would revolutionize the sale of food itself with a style that would come to be known as fast food. The success of the White Castle chain was rooted largely in the power of propaganda, something that was both an original innovation and necessary to change the public's negative perception of the hamburger.

White Castle also pioneered the concept of take-out service, and the restaurant is further known for being the first to market square burgers, called " sliders ", which were sold for five cents into the s. In , White Castle created its first subsidiary: Paperlynen Company, which provided the cartons and wrapping paper that the food was served in, as well as the hats worn by the kitchen staff.

It acquired porcelain companies in a similar fashion, placing them in charge of building small White Castle restaurants using white porcelain facades. Walter Anderson contributed a number of novel ideas to White Castle during its early years, including the creation of a special spatula and a special bread for the burgers.

In , an employee named Earl Howell calculated the amount of time that it took to break hamburgers apart in a presentable fashion, eventually leading him to create the perforated burger. By , White Castle had incorporated five perforations into its burgers. The meat was frozen and hamburgers came to be cooked from frozen, instead of using fresh meat. White Castle revolutionized the burger-making process by regularizing the finished products and using hygienic preparation techniques that were in clear view of the customers.

One of these imitators also had a highly similar name, White Tower Hamburgers of Milwaukee , Wisconsin , founded by the father and son tandem of John E. The creation of White Tower led to numerous legal battles between it and White Castle during the s.

The success of its sales eventually led to the May 15, , opening of a restaurant named McDonald's along U.

Gourmet Burgers

Route 66 in San Bernardino, California. Many recipes and dishes traveled along with transatlantic immigrants to their destinations in the New World. Some authors question whether the Hamburg America Line was part of this, arguing that the hamburger was created to meet needs that arose amongst immigrants already in the New World.

See also: History of the hamburger in the United States The industrial use of mechanical meat shredding was the technical advance that helped popularize the Hamburg steak. The first meat grinder was invented in the early 19th century by the German engineer Karl Drais. The machine made it possible for minced meat to be sold at market in large quantities at reasonable prices. By , numerous patents existed for improved meat grinders in the United States.

Before this, minced meat was prepared by hand at home using specialized chisels , intensive manual labor that severely limited the amount that could be produced.

By the late 19th century, an increasing amount of land was being devoted to cattle and a growing number of people being employed as cowboys , resulting in the United States becoming one of the world's largest producers and consumers of beef.

This gave rise to various methods of meat preservation for making possible the consumption of fresh meat in urban and industrialized areas, among the refrigerator cars and different methods of packaging meat such as corned beef , which were promoted by industrialists like Gustavus Swift — Around this time, the city of Chicago, along with other cities on the East Coast , became a focal point for the large-scale processing of beef.

Beef was already inexpensive at that time, and it was available to the working class. This put the Hamburg steak within reach of the vast majority of the population, giving rise to what some authors jokingly call the "American beef dream".

The high production and consumption of beef cattle in the United States made the meat industry increasingly powerful by the end of the 19th century. At the beginning of the 20th century, Upton Sinclair published The Jungle , a novel about conspiracies and corruption in the American meat industry, intended as a veiled criticism of the industry itself.

The book raised popular awareness about the safety of meat processing and helped lead to the creation of the Pure Food and Drug Act , which was sponsored by the Food and Drug Administration. The Jungle was a milestone in the subsequent history of the hamburger, as it led the American public to force restaurant chains to prove the safety of their cooked meat. Controversial origins[ edit ] The Big Mac popularized an evolution in the image of the hamburger.

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The exact origin of the hamburger may never be known with any certainty. Most historians believe that it was invented by a cook who placed a Hamburg steak between two slices of bread in a small town in Texas, and others credit the founder of White Castle for developing the "Hamburger Sandwich. Despite varieties, there are common elements in all of the narratives, most notably that the hamburger was born as a food associated with major events such as amusement parks , fairs , conferences , and festivals.

All the hypotheses also share the presence of street vendors. Legend has it that during the course of the Fair, the Menches ran out of their signature menu item of pork sausage sandwiches. Their local supplier, Hamburg butcher Andrew Klein, was reluctant to butcher more hogs during a period of unseasonable late summer heat and suggested to substitute the use of ground beef.

The brothers fired some up, but both found it dry and bland.

They added coffee, brown sugar and other ingredients to create a unique taste. The original sandwiches were sold with just ketchup and sliced onions. In the s, carnival historian John C. One of the possible fathers of the hamburger is Charlie Nagreen — of Seymour, Wisconsin , who at the age of 15 sold Hamburg steaks from a street stall at the annual Outagamie County Fair.

Nagreen said he began by selling Hamburg steaks, but these did not have much success because people wanted to freely move around the festival without the need to eat them at his stand. In response to this, in Nagreen decided to flatten the hamburger steak and insert it between two slices of bread, so that the public could move freely from booth to booth while eating his sandwich, an innovation that was well received by his customers.

To this day, his accomplishment is celebrated annually with a "Burger Fest" in his honor in his hometown of Seymour. Another alleged inventor of the hamburger is the cook Fletcher Davis better known as "Old Dave" , who claimed to have had the idea of putting ground beef between two pieces of Texas Toast when one of his customers was in too much of a hurry to sit down for a meal.

The customer walked away with his Hamburger Steak and seemed so content that Old Dave offered his new carryout meal as a staple menu item at the end of in Athens, Texas. Fletcher had a stall with his wife at the St.

PDF Hamburger Gourmet Bible: Delicious And Mouth-watering Burger Recipes Easy To Make Impress

Louis World's Fair of Texan journalist Frank X. During the s, the Dairy Queen ice cream chain filmed a documentary about the birthplace of the hamburger featuring Davis' story. McDonald's book The Complete Hamburger. This statement has been very poorly documented or substantiated, and in the case of an oral tradition, it is not without its contradictions.

Another version of the creation of the hamburger is that of German cook Otto Kuasw, who created a very popular sailors' sandwich made of a fillet of beef patty fried in butter, served with a fried egg , between two toasted buns in , at a post in Hamburg , Germany. The sandwich was called the "Deutsches Beefsteak", German for "German beefsteak". Many of the sailors traveling on ships between Hamburg and New York requested a similar "Hamburg style" sandwich at American steakhouses.

There are many additional claims as to the origin of the hamburger. A local newspaper claims that Louis Lassen, a Danish immigrant who arrived in America in , sold butter and eggs as a street vendor. In , in an interview with The New York Times , he recounted how he created a hamburger steak sandwich with small strips of beef for a restaurant known as Louis' Lunch. Lassen's family claims as the year of his invention. Revealed in a public confrontation between the grandson of Louis, Kenneth Davis Lassen Fletch, and his uncle, documentation signed under notary in demonstrates the development of the hamburger, as it stresses the difference between a "hamburger steak" and a "hamburger sandwich".

Louis, Missouri in The stoves use hinged steel wire gridirons to hold the hamburgers in place while they cook simultaneously on both sides. The gridirons were made by Luigi Pieragostini and patented in One of these accompaniments, which is still common with today's burger, is ketchup , a type of tomato sauce with a blend of flavors between sweet and sour that was first produced commercially in by entrepreneur and chef Henry John Heinz in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania.

It is possible that after the creation of the hamburger by uniting the steak with the bread, vegetables were included to give the finished product a more "natural" appearance and taste. The people of this region used to prepare meals with small amounts of fried fish , but when the river froze over and fishing became impossible, they would cut up potatoes and fry them in animal oil.

The improvements in potato freezing technology made by J. Simplot of Idaho City in , made the large scale production of French fries possible. Before the potatoes were frozen, however, they had still lost some of their flavor during frying, but new processes such as a further improved Simplot invention avoided this inconvenience by , largely thanks to the use of a mixture of cow tallow and soybean oil.

Initially, however, there were safety concerns raised over some fries and the kitchens in which they were prepared, leading some companies, such as White Castle , to remove them from their menus during the s. In the late 19th century, it was sold as a bottled soft drink in most of the United States. In the early 20th century, another beverage, Pepsi , was created by pharmacist Caleb Bradham and quickly came to rival the sales of Coca-Cola.

Strategic alliances between large burger restaurant chains and these two soft drink companies greatly increased the beverages' availability to the general public. Commercialization[ edit ] The hamburger solved the technical problem of mass-producing semi-processed food. The dawn of the 20th century witnessed the need to provide food for people living in highly productive urban centers with high population densities.

Food also had to be economically affordable for the working class in order for them to maintain their labor and industrial production. The burger was born in a time when people needed to eat both "fast" and "cheap". The socio-economic environment of the United States at the time of the burger's rise to popularity coincided with the end of World War I and the beginning of the Great Depression of This environment was particularly favorable for fostering inexpensive food, which was one reason why five-cent hamburgers were so popular.

After its invention during the first decade of the 20th century, the hamburger came to be marketed on a large scale, after "visionaries" realized that it would benefit greatly from a mass production process. The widespread appearance of telephones occurred at the beginning of the 20th century, along with other modern means of communication, including radio. For the average American who had not eaten in a restaurant in his or her entire life, [54] the fast food chains that appeared in the cities offered an alternative form of restaurant in which eating was very much a public activity.

The concept of a " greasy spoon " was thus born with these restaurants[ citation needed ], in which hygiene suffered in exchange for more inexpensive food. On the other hand, there was a growing interconnected world in which trips by car, bus, and rail became increasingly available. All these means of transport were improving at the time, and soon it was necessary to feed a growing population that was "in permanent transit", frequently moving through different cities on business.

Similarly, the English immigrant Frederick Henry Harvey was the first to use "dynamic mass movement" in restoring the Fred Harvey Company , which catered to the patrons of a chain of hotels located near railway stations, as well as offering catering, services, and high quality products on the trains themselves.

For example, German immigrant Charles Feltman invented the hot dog in in his stall in Coney Island , New York by pairing a frankfurter with a bread bun. Similarly, Italian immigrants sold ice cream from vending carts in the streets or pasta at their restaurants.

Chinese immigrants initially opened restaurants to cater to their fellow Chinese-Americans, but they gradually became accepted by the American clientele, sometimes resulting in truly Chinese-American cuisine such as chop suey. In this diverse world of ethnic foods, the hamburger was able to rise to mainstream popularity and become a national food of the United States. At this time, the hamburger was still not widely known by the American public.

Anderson added onion rings to the burgers while they grilled, giving them a distinctive flavor. Despite some growth, Anderson had opened only four stands in the busiest areas of the city. The restaurant was founded on the idea of cooking a hamburger quickly, giving it the honor of being the first fast food restaurant.

Ingram soon realized that the word burger evoked connotations of circus performances at livestock markets and greasy pieces of meat eaten in the poorest districts of the city in the collective mind of the American public.

He tried to change those connotations from White Castle's earliest days. At the same time, he became known to some as the Henry Ford of the hamburger, [26] while inventing a restaurant concept he called the "White Castle System", which helped the hamburger achieve fame.

In order to raise awareness among White Castle employees, a newsletter entitled "The hot hamburger" was circulated throughout the company, which challenged the employees to improve the sale of the burgers with a simple idea: to be able to prepare burgers rapidly so anyone could purchase and eat them anytime and anywhere. Instead of waiting for half an hour to be served at a traditional restaurant, the White Castle System provided rapid service and a menu centered around the hamburger. At the time, the hamburger was typically served with coffee.

In addition to offering clean and safe food, White Castle offered regularity and standardization, ensuring that each patty was served in the same manner in each restaurant.

At the time, this was an entirely novel idea that would revolutionize the sale of food itself with a style that would come to be known as fast food. The success of the White Castle chain was rooted largely in the power of propaganda, something that was both an original innovation and necessary to change the public's negative perception of the hamburger.Eat Grassfed get rewards Download and order with the Farm Burger app to start earning perks!

They wrapped a few slices of meat under their saddles so it would crumble under pressure and motion and be cooked by heat and friction. Instead of waiting for half an hour to be served at a traditional restaurant, the White Castle System provided rapid service and a menu centered around the hamburger. The stoves use hinged steel wire gridirons to hold the hamburgers in place while they cook simultaneously on both sides.

Salmon Burger flame broiled and served with lettuce, red onion, tomato, pickle on a whole wheat bun The first meat grinder was invented in the early 19th century by the German engineer Karl Drais. This is evident from its detailed description in some of the most popular cookbooks of the day. One of the possible fathers of the hamburger is Charlie Nagreen — of Seymour, Wisconsin , who at the age of 15 sold Hamburg steaks from a street stall at the annual Outagamie County Fair.

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