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CLONING INTERNET APPLICATIONS WITH RUBY PDF

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Contribute to mattswann/wdi_resources development by creating an account on GitHub. Cloning Internet Applications with Ruby Make your own TinyURL, Twitter, Flickr, or Facebook using Ruby Chang Sau Sheo. The user's ac- tivity feed is visible to all users who visit his user page. For More Information: myavr.info


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cloning internet applications with pdf. Natural cloning. Cloning is a natural form of reproduction that has allowed life forms to spread for hundreds of millions of. Cloning Internet Applications with Ruby This is a hands on book with plenty of well explained code Each chapter has a standalone project in which a complete . Cloning Internet Applications With Ruby Sheong Chang Sau. Cloning Internet Applications With style data rar, word, zip, ppt, pdf, txt, and kindle. Do not miss it .

The first chapter concludes with a quick tutorial that uses Sinatra to build a complete web app.

This chapter does dive straight in to some of the more advanced aspects of Sinatra, but it is more to whet the appetite for what is to follow, rather than a tutorial of how it works and this is made clear in the text. A Highlight in this chapter was the introduction of the new streaming API that allows you to keep the connection to the server open and do things like this: The chapter also covers useful stuff such as caching, error handling particularly and Internal Server errors , before and after filters, and rendering views and sessions.

A lot of this info can be found in the excellent ReadMe section of the Sinatra website, but it was nice to see it all written down in the same place.

Chapter 3 starts to get heavier and highlights the symbiotic relationship that Sinatra has with Rack — the foundation for its magic.

It also covers how to go about extending the functionality of Sinatra using extension methods and helpers. Generally, extensions are used configuration or routing, whereas helpers are used in view blocks and templates.

The chapter then goes quite deep into Rack and has a great example of a mini-implementation of Sinatra using Rack, which shows a little of how Sinatra and Rack work together. The chapter finishes by discussing how to use Sinatra to create Rack middleware applications. Chapter 4 shows how you can subclass Sinatra in order to build modular applications. This builds the foundations of the good practice of creating your own structured framework.

This is done by subclassing Sinatra itself like so: It then goes on to explain how to use the run! Settings are discussed next and, it turns out, they are actually just methods of the application class. It also covers subclassing these classes further and how the routes are inherited.

Cloning Internet Applications with Ruby by Chang Sau Sheong PDF

The chapter finishes off by showing how these subclasses fit into the Rack ecosystem as middleware and also how to use Extensions and Helpers in modular applications. The last chapter in the book takes a more tutorial-led approach, going through the steps required to build a blog application that uses Git for versioning.

There are some great nuggets in this chapter, including using the ostruct library to store the blog posts, using a hook to reload the app whenever there are any updates, and parsing the data for each article on the pages. A Highlight in this chapter was the introduction of the new streaming API that allows you to keep the connection to the server open and do things like this: The chapter also covers useful stuff such as caching, error handling particularly and Internal Server errors , before and after filters, and rendering views and sessions.

A lot of this info can be found in the excellent ReadMe section of the Sinatra website, but it was nice to see it all written down in the same place. Chapter 3 starts to get heavier and highlights the symbiotic relationship that Sinatra has with Rack — the foundation for its magic.

Ruby Learning

It also covers how to go about extending the functionality of Sinatra using extension methods and helpers. Generally, extensions are used configuration or routing, whereas helpers are used in view blocks and templates.

The chapter then goes quite deep into Rack and has a great example of a mini-implementation of Sinatra using Rack, which shows a little of how Sinatra and Rack work together. The chapter finishes by discussing how to use Sinatra to create Rack middleware applications. Chapter 4 shows how you can subclass Sinatra in order to build modular applications. This builds the foundations of the good practice of creating your own structured framework.

This is done by subclassing Sinatra itself like so: It then goes on to explain how to use the run! Settings are discussed next and, it turns out, they are actually just methods of the application class. It also covers subclassing these classes further and how the routes are inherited.

The chapter finishes off by showing how these subclasses fit into the Rack ecosystem as middleware and also how to use Extensions and Helpers in modular applications.

The last chapter in the book takes a more tutorial-led approach, going through the steps required to build a blog application that uses Git for versioning. There are some great nuggets in this chapter, including using the ostruct library to store the blog posts, using a hook to reload the app whenever there are any updates, and parsing the data for each article on the pages.

Ruby on Rails Tutorial

It was also nice to see how the project folder was structured and some examples of views using erb, markdown, JavaScript and CSS. As a tutorial, it moves along at a fair pace — a lot of ground is covered in only a few pages — but it is easy to follow.Ruby empowers you to develop your own clones of such applications without much ordeal.

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All in all, he has more than 15 years of application development experience, mostly web application and in the past 5 years, mostly in Ruby. Chapter 5: That download cloning internet applications will debunk grown to their My Digital Library when they are in and enter to increase it. In turn, that kickstarted me into on a whimsy challenge to do the same with Twitter in the same number of lines of code, using Sinatra and later, TinyURL in 40 lines of code.

For now, just notice that we deploy the user data model as a gem, and require it in the server application. This resulted in a book that has been revised repeated as companies, statistics and technologies changed. Konstantin is the current maintainer of Sinatra and probably knows more about it than anybody else You can find out more about him in my interview.

I will be using Sinatra for both the middleware as well as the server.

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Feel free to read my other articles. I have always been a very creative person and find it relaxing to indulge in ten-ball. I love mortally .