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THE PATH OF DAGGERS PDF

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The Eye of the World. The Great Hunt. The Dragon Reborn. The Shadow Rising. The Fires of Heaven. Lord of Chaos. A Crown of Swords. The Path of Daggers. The Path Of Daggers – Wheel Of Time 08 Robert Jordan This is a work of fiction. All the characters and events portraye The Path of Daggers · The Path of. Editorial Reviews. myavr.info Review. Robert Jordan's bestselling Wheel of Time epic is one of the most popular fantasy series of all time for a reason.


The Path Of Daggers Pdf

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The Path of Daggers: The Wheel of Time Book 8 by Robert Jordan, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. The Path of Daggers is a fantasy novel by American author Robert Jordan, the eighth book of . Print/export. Create a book · Download as PDF · Printable version. The Path of Daggers book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The Seanchan invasion force is in possession of Ebou Dar. Ny.

Nine books in twelve months? Easy peasy. Less and less happens. The flaws stand out more as the plot thins. I've gotten through three of these books in ten months. Even if I manage to do one per month from here on out, I won't be My crawl through this series continues. Even if I manage to do one per month from here on out, I won't be getting to A Memory of Light until April though I anticipate my enjoyment increasing when Sanderson takes over, so maybe let's say March instead.

What's really frustrating about this series is that Jordan was clearly a gifted worldbuilder. Even as my enjoyment in these books decreases, it's clear that an incredible amount of thought and planning went into their creation. The level of detail on each culture, their histories, traditions and behaviors.

The ways each nation interacts with another. The ways the current situation with Rand and the Forsaken and the approaching last battle have created a complicated interlocking game of cause and effect, each player trying to seize control. But the problem here is that none of that makes for a compelling narrative.

A story should not be an excuse to show off your worldbuilding. The worldbuilding should be there as support to the story, not the focus.

So, so many times in this book, I found myself overwhelmed and bored by the sheer amount of superfluous characters with no arcs and no bearing on the story. So many times characters just sit around musing on things that have happened or aren't happening or are going to happen, while nothing actually happens for hundreds of pages on end because Jordan wanted to make sure we really got that the Aes Sedai argue a lot. So what actually happened in this book? Not much. Much more in the second half than in the first, certainly.

We've got: Elayne accidentally blows things up while undoing a weave, causing the rumor to spread that the Aes Sedai have a new weapon. Elayne and Aviendha decide to officially become first sisters. They travel to Caemlyn so Elayne can take her throne. There is a traitor in their midst. Perrin and Co. They make an alliance with Alliandre. They travel to find Masema. Perrin learns that if he yells at Faile, she will be less mad at him all the time.

While Perrin is off retrieving Masema, Faile along with Alliandre and her servants, which includes Morgase in disguise are capture by the Shaido. Egwene makes her move to solidify her power with the Aes Sedai.

She maneuvers so that the Hall declares war on Elaida, and the book ends with her forces Traveling to the Dragonmount. Rand is finally succumbing to the madness from the taint of Saidin. He spends the whole book trying to save face and not let anyone see how sick he is.

He is also paranoid. He is also paranoid with reason, as his own Ash'aman include traitors. They push back the Seanchan in Ebou Dar at great cost. Rand kills a bunch of people on both sides. Dashiva the Ash'aman for some reason decides to kill him when they are back in Cairhien.

Rand decides to go see Elayne so as to formalize their little polyamorous arrangement, and also he is butthurt because he thinks she doesn't like him anymore. Various interludes showcase the Forsaken, the Shaido, etc. None of them are really significant or interesting, except the one with Cadsuane, which shows she may be the one to get through to Rand who is a terrible leader , and the one at the White Tower, which shows some sisters finally beginning to make progress on identifying the Black Ajah within their ranks.

This book was pages long. At least it wasn't longer. I wish he would stop treading water and stop wasting precious narrative time on petty feuds and layovers and status updates, and give us the real goods: Unfortunately, I've been reliably informed that I've got two more books of meandering before the pace supposedly picks up again in book eleven.

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Lastly, I just want to talk about Rand for a sec. He was a harmlessly likable main character in book one, and only mildly irritating in book two, but since then, he has just descended into this heartless, cruel, anger-ridden character who is so incredibly uninteresting to read about.

He doesn't seem to be learning, and no one is telling him in a competent, human way that he is terrible. Take this exchange, between Rand and Narishma. Narishma is one of his Ash'aman, and he has just come back from a perilous errand to retrieve the sword Callandor, an errand that Rand sent him on. This is how he treats Narishma upon his return: Springing from the cot, Rand snatched the bundle before Narishma could proffer it. I expected you last night.

You nearly killed me. He was sure of it. There was no point in trusting the man as far as he had, only to have him die and ruin everything. Carefully he tucked the bundle beneath his cot. His hands trembled with the urge to strip the wrapping away, to make sure they held what Narishma had been sent for. The man would not have dared to return if they did not. Narishma, who has given Rand no indication of being untrustworthy in fact, Rand must have trusted him to give him such an important mission, out of hundreds of Ash'aman has just come back, giving Rand what he asked for, and he has done so letting Rand know there were extra wards that Rand did not tell him about.

Instead of thanking him for risking his life and succeeding despite unexpected peril, Rand berates him, disbelieves him. He immediately distrusts his comrade, instead of thinking that someone else might have added wards on top of his own as a trap for anyone retrieving the sword. He then dismisses Narishma seemingly without thought, parting by threatening to kill him. He has taken a moment in which he could have built solidarity with his subordinate, inspired loyalty, and instead dismissed and humiliated and threatened him.

There is absolutely no reason Rand could not have expressed the same practical sentiments, even the part about secrecy being worth Narishma's life, in more appreciative terms, in terms an actual leader would use, a leader who inspires his troops rather than rules them from a place of fear, as Rand is doing now. I kind of despise him. Richard Rahl from the Sword of Truth I've read through book five as of now.

Total and utter dictator. Cruel, stupid, overbearing. And while I still hold out hope that Rand will learn to effectively lead and rehumanize himself in future books, I fully expect Richard to become even worse over time, as the author clearly believes his actions noble, and has no intention of criticizing them.

I don't foresee it changing my opinion about the book one way or the other. At least I know two things that will happen, even if almost nothing else will. I think there is still more dull to come] Executive Summary: This is definitely one of the weaker books in the series so far, and there are a large number of pages where it feels like very little happens.

I'm still enjoying my reread, but I know that things will only get slower before they finally pick back up again. Doing this book in audio is pretty much a must for me now. I don't think I'd have managed to read it very quickly otherwise. Micheal Kramer and Kate Reading are fantastic as always. Full Review This book should ma Executive Summary: There is so much pointless bickering at times, it really bogs part of the book down.

There are a few very big plot developments here, one near the beginning, but most of them occur near the end.

That leaves a lot of pages in between where I was left wondering what the point of some of these chapters were. And if that's not bad enough, Mat was completely missing. We got a lot of him in the last book, and he seems to like to take time away, much like he did with Perrin in The Fires of Heaven. My other problem is that I find myself starting to get annoyed by many of the characters.

I think my affection for many of them at different parts of the series helps carry me through, but I feel like a lot of this could have been edited down. I'm still enjoying my reread, but I'm dreading the next two books a little bit. Of course the end of this book left me eager to pick up the next one soon, but that's often the case with this series, even in the weakest books.

Mar 23, Phrynne rated it really liked it. I really enjoyed this book and what a great series this is turning out to be. There was a lot more action in this one which is number 8 and a lot of character development.

I am listening to the series on audio book and was quite surprised when it suddenly finished right in the middle of so many major events. Now I have to start straight into the next book. How lucky they are all published and I do not have to wait weeks or even years for the next instalment! View all 3 comments. I congratulate everyone who has the perseverance to continue on while envying those who had the force of will to just forget about how this epic story is supposed to end.

Here we are at book 8 and like book 7, very little of the main plot actually happens.

The Path of Daggers

Most of the book are again devoted to describing in excruciating detail of how the main characters tend to act and think, with very little variation, mostly accomplishing nothing except introduce filler and making characters feel one-dimension I congratulate everyone who has the perseverance to continue on while envying those who had the force of will to just forget about how this epic story is supposed to end.

Most of the book are again devoted to describing in excruciating detail of how the main characters tend to act and think, with very little variation, mostly accomplishing nothing except introduce filler and making characters feel one-dimensional. Of course, there's now also a bit of slavery coming in so expect to see a lot of boxing and switching in addition to the breasts of book 7. Yes, I'm ranting, but I'm still reading.

I don't know what Jordan was hoping to do when writing this book. The focus on the main characters appears to be more on Egwene this time, but there's a bit of the others. His style is still there and when the main plot moves an inch, you can tell that his superb writing skills are still there.

It's just that, strangely, he indulges in the over-description of very trivial events, very trivial one-off characters, and very trivial dialogues. If you can still stomach the incredibly wordy descriptions, there's still bits of gems here and there. View 1 comment.

I enjoyed it as much as the previous books. I sound like a broken record, but maybe that's appropriate for a series called The Wheel of Time Quite a few small and not-so-small threads made some significant progress and there were several things I particularly enjoyed reading about.

My spoiler-filled comments are enclosed in the tags below. These are just random comments about some of the things I enjoyed or that stuck out to me. I was also happy to see Elayne get back home to start dealing with the business of taking the throne.

Assuming the ones who were captured by the Shaido get free, or get rescued by Perrin, of course, and they all manage to meet back up. This was one of the storylines I wanted to spend more time in. Initial results seem promising. I was also really engrossed in the itsy bitsy storyline that started in the previous book with Seaine and Pevara trying to root out the black ajah in the white tower.

Very few pages have been devoted to it, but I was enjoying it, especially once they started using the oath rod. Logain finally showed back up too, but so, so briefly. I'm expecting more trouble! Mat and Thom were both completely missing from this book, which was a little annoying considering they were in jeopardy at the end of the previous book. Probably like most people with this series, I have a love-hate relationship with the Wheel of Time.

I really love the world and the writing and Jordan does a great job with the characters, even the ones I can't stand. This book really shows the bloat in the series, but I think also seriously tries to turn a corner as far as contracting the plot instead of expanding it more.

I say tries, because I'm not quite sure if it succeeds. Seriously, if people could just stay dead, that would solve a lot of Probably like most people with this series, I have a love-hate relationship with the Wheel of Time. Seriously, if people could just stay dead, that would solve a lot of the issues you know.

I really do love the world, so it's hard to hate the slow pace of the plot progression too much, but it's frustrating enough that it's taking me a while to read through these books.

I'm starting to have a hard time remembering who's who so good thing for the spoiler-filled WOT-wiki. There were some good moments, but still some, seemingly, useless plot contrivances see Bowl of Winds which I've complained about before. I'm looking forward to the next book, but it's hard to look at this one and think, "wow, just 6 more to go!

There wasn't very much of Met in this book I guess everyone need a break at some point of this looong story; , so I will reminiscence on some details about Mat, that is the best bloody character I've ever read!!! Blood and bloody ashes! I'm usually pretty good at staying alive. I've only failed one time that I can remem There wasn't very much of Met in this book I guess everyone need a break at some point of this looong story; , so I will reminiscence on some details about Mat, that is the best bloody character I've ever read!!!

I've only failed one time that I can remember, and it hardly counts Dec 22, Richard Bray rated it liked it. By the time the next book had been published, I found it impossible to distinguish the lesser characters or keep the infinite subplots tidy in my mind. The first is his wordiness, the way he uses a full page to describe something when a sentence will do.

Sometimes it makes for beautiful prose, but most of the time it just seems like verbal diarrhea. Jordan reminds me of these people. Jordan has created a deep and detailed world and he literally provides us with dozens of POV characters.

Early in the series, this was a strength, but as Jordan has added more characters, plots and subplots, it has become too much for him — and possibly any author — to manage. Characters take center stage in one book, then disappear for the next two. Or a character does nothing for a book or two, finally lulling you into complete and utter apathy, and then they take center stage. But once she became the Amyrlin Seat, she spent the next two books doing nothing. Then she began taking action in this book, moving the plot forward and changing the landscape of the story.

So, of course, I was disappointed when Mat made exactly zero appearances in this book. There are no beginnings or endings to the Wheel of Time series but there is plenty of room for re-reading. However, unfortunately - at least for myself - this is the point in the series where everything started to become slow. I don't find that it became any less enjoyable, but nothing really happens in this book and in the two following. From books 8 to 10 the material could easily have been condensed into one solid page novel rather than three separate to page novels.

What Robert Jo There are no beginnings or endings to the Wheel of Time series but there is plenty of room for re-reading. What Robert Jordan did at this point in my eyes is to stretch his material, apparently losing track of his grand and sprawling world, to the point where he lost complete control of his pacing. I find that pacing can be crucial for a novel. There have been novels I have read which were brilliantly plotted yet the very end was hastily strung together to resolve the crisis.

The climax lost its power and deus-ex-machinas became a highlight as a result. This is what I feel happens to a degree in this novel.

I've mentioned that Jordan has a tendency to allow other previous novels to end in a rush of action after a slow crawl, however this novel happens to feature a particularly rushed conclusion. The pace of which throws the balance of the novel out of alignment. The plot focuses on nearly all our main characters. However the big flaw of this novel is that a drawcard character - Matrim Cauthon - has no scenes, whatsoever in this novel.

I'm a firm believer that if you, as a writer, are not the most skilled artiste with your use of language, that you have to use what you do have to the best. I did not receive the sense from this novel that Jordan did that.

His prose is passable certainly, yet as a writer lacking the power of greater literary stylists, for him to write a novel not utilising drawcard characters, is in my eyes a mistake. Apart from the usual political scandals or battles rocking the world of The Wheel of Time or Randland as it is otherwise nicknamed by the fans very little happens in this book.

That is until the end, which is why as mentioned before the pacing feels off for this entire book. It meanders until the end.

Of course I personally find that it meanders in an entertaining if not profound way and then tries to set up a series of events for the following novel. On the whole I would state that, as when I first read this novel, this is a lowlight in an otherwise monumental series. It certainly is a passably adequate novel, yet it lacks the storytelling power of other books in the series. I believe strongly that Jordan's series is one in which the ideas and the story is greater than the novels themselves at times.

Save for books 3,4,5 and 11 onwards which are excellent as novels in my eyes. Take it or leave it, The Wheel of Time is a great achievement of a series.

However it tends to be one of those series read mainly for the entertainment aspect. The writing is merely adequate, the characters wax and wane and the battle sequences as a point of difference are thrilling.

It is a masterpiece in my eyes, yet one which has incredibly visible flaws. And I somehow like it all the more for that. Nov 11, Kyle rated it liked it. The Wheel of Time series represents, for me, the perfect example of a guilty pleasure in the world of fantasy.

This series is not actually written very well. Robert Jordan was not a very good wordsmith, and he really only knew how to say and describe things one way.

His characters are generally unbelievable, and have ridiculous dialogue. The plot is tremendously predictable, and is heavily influenced close to the point of being unoriginal by the fantasy works that came before.

The whole story i The Wheel of Time series represents, for me, the perfect example of a guilty pleasure in the world of fantasy. The whole story is much, much longer than it needs to be and obviously became bigger than Jordan could handle. That being said I still enjoy these books. I can't rationally explain it, and I've re-read most of them at least a couple times.

I shouldn't be so attached to them, yet I'm chained by my own embarrassed desire to periodically dive into the wheel of time. The only explanation I can think of, is that Jordan was a wizard. Not a skillful, subtle, thoughtful wizard; a sneaky, dark, and soul-sucking wizard who has enchanted me by his mediocre writing. Many people despise and look down their nose at these books, and I totally understand that. Many people also love and adore these books, and will forever place The Wheel of Time series upon their list of all-time favorite books.

I can understand that impulse too. I realize this review is lacking in helpfulness, but the important thing to take away is this: If you hate them, then fine. At least you'll have given them a chance. If you Love them, then great! Good for you, and you have a long, LONG, journey ahead of you filled with something you love. Either way, you'll have exposed yourself to one of the most famous fantasy series of all time.

The 8th part of this magnificent series, with things evolving in the same rhythms as the previous one, with most protagonists having intense activity. The Dragon has somehow balanced things, with the help of consultants who accept to listen to their advice and with his allies continues his course, but his successes have exacerbated his self-confidence and make him carelessness, causing problems as well carelessness is the only thing he does not need when its enemies make plans, and the invaders The 8th part of this magnificent series, with things evolving in the same rhythms as the previous one, with most protagonists having intense activity.

The Dragon has somehow balanced things, with the help of consultants who accept to listen to their advice and with his allies continues his course, but his successes have exacerbated his self-confidence and make him carelessness, causing problems as well carelessness is the only thing he does not need when its enemies make plans, and the invaders across the ocean continue to procrastinate, on a collision course with him that unavoidable will lead to a huge battle.

His friends who their fate designate them to lead are gaining more and more confidence in this role, having the necessary help from experienced people, so they can give courage and confidence to their followers and become more effective. Along with this, however, more responsibilities come, and the weights they have to lift are growing. The young leader of the rebel Aes Sedai, has the most difficult role, as her power is constantly questioned, but with clever handling, she tries to consolidate her power more and gain respect before the campaign against the White Tower begins.

In general, it is a book that is very interesting as our heroes are evolving even further, going a long way forward, through situations that can be funny, dangerous, even emotional.

This interest becomes even more intense since even the rest of the protagonists in our history, on the two opposing sides of light and darkness, do not remain idle and make tireless efforts to play their own role in the developments that may follow slow rhythms but they are especially crucial for the continuation, especially towards the end of the book, where things become dangerous as we move towards the heart of winter.

A Verbose book as usual, with lot of descriptions and some significant incidents.. Missed Mat in this book.. And end chapters were better than the rest of the book.. Nov 03, Manveer rated it really liked it Shelves: This obsession and excessive WoT reading is unhealthy, I think. Well, in my defense, this book was very small. No Mat POV sucked, especially given his situation at the end of the last book. Rest was pretty much fine, I guess.

Oct 22, Trent rated it it was amazing Shelves: Perhaps it was because it is the shortest book in the series, but I flew through this one and enjoyed almost every second. While the Bowl of the Winds scene was cool, the eacape from the Seanchan was straight up 4.

While the Bowl of the Winds scene was cool, the eacape from the Seanchan was straight up awe-inspiring. Rand learns of the Seanchan invasion and immediately looks to marshal his troops and Asha'man to repel them while also consolidating his new throne in Ilian. Some of the politics are bland, but the battles and betrayals are pretty exciting.

This storyline was pretty straight forward. Many of the rebels considered Egwene a pawn, but she turns the tables on them and it's hilarious. She is now in position to lay siege to the White Tower.

The Path of Daggers

This plot-line was pretty blah, though I do like Perrin. Overall, I enjoyed this book more than Crown of Swords. Perhaps it seemed so much quicker paced simply because it was short, or maybe because I like where the story is going. Either way, the character didn't seem nearly as stupid, and awesome things happened. I loved it!

Wheel of Time is highly recommended. I thought perhaps I wouldn't like it quite as much on a re-read, but if anything I enjoyed it even more. Yes, there is a definite lack of Mat, which would be an issue for any book, and enough for me to drop this to a 4. But otherwise, this is an excellent entry in this series. The pacing is perfect after all, it's the shortest book in the series , and everyone's storylines move forward in a meaningful way.

That's a lot, and it was awesome. Rand engages the Seanchan in multiple epic battles which include the reader getting Seanchan POVs for the first time, allowing us to actually get to know their culture a bit , and he loses. In the process, he also learns the weaknesses of Callandor.

All of which is awesome. It's awesome. Before this can be accomplished, however, Faile and Morgase! And you guessed it, it's awesome. Look, this isn't a Top 5 book in the series - but it's nowhere near a 'slog', either. We may not get a big battle with the Forsaken, and obviously, we all miss Mat, but this is a really good book. In fact, I might even call it I struggled knowing what to rate this book as at first because I didn't live it as much as the previous 2 all the way through and it did seem a little slower in places, however I did think that it was filled with some interesting things and events.

I would have like it to be longer as many have said and more dramatic at the ending, but overall it was a good addition in the series. One thing I enjoyed in this book was the return I struggled knowing what to rate this book as at first because I didn't live it as much as the previous 2 all the way through and it did seem a little slower in places, however I did think that it was filled with some interesting things and events.

One thing I enjoyed in this book was the return of Elyas who was a really interesting character from an earlier book and one that makes Perrin's story a lot better. He's a good friend to Perrin and he knows a lot about the troubles Perrin will have to face in future meaning that he's a good 'guide' for him.

Egwene become a very feisty and sneaky character in this book which I very much enjoyed and I think that the next book will be even more dramatic with her.

She started in the last book to really show her initial plans but in this one she grows up and fulfils some of them. I do think that this book marks a change in many of the characters for they way that they handle themselves and the things that they achieve. They all go from being young adults to really growing into their roles and that makes a nice change.

Elayne also has to grow up further in this book as she marches to reclaim her title. She's dedicated to her cause and she knows what she has to do to achieve her goals which makes her far more interesting than before where she mostly whined. Cadsuane is a sneaky and very conniving character whom I have yet to make my mind up about. Sometimes she seems nice and knowledgeable whilst at other times she's sarcastic and unhelpful.

I'm not sure I know what her true motives are yet and so she's certainly one to watch Min continues to be a good character in this book and stays by Rand's side again. She is a fun character but she seems to be rather dependant on Rand and her worries over him rather than all of the auras and visions she sees which can get slightly on my nerves. Even so she's still a great and jokey character and she helps us see Rand as a more down to earth person.

In this book Rand has a few struggles with the Asha'man and this leads up to problems by the end of the book. We also have the struggle. Mat isn't a huge character in this book and doesn't have a huge focus. Perrin equally doesn't feature too largely as he's journeying to meet the Prophet. Faile is an important character at the end of this book from the position she ends up in and I hope that this predicament means she'll have a more excited story from now on.

Overall a good book and a good continuation. It could be better with more of a climatic ending as this wasn't as dramatic as I hoped but I'm looking forward to the next book.

A Path of Daggers is the low point for me in the Wheel of Time series. It can easily be summed up as various groups of catty women vying for superiority over each other.

Seriously, the first third consists of Elayne and Nynaeve, Aviendha, Birgitte, the rebel Aes Sedai with them, the Sea Folk, and the Kin, all trying to out-do each other on the way to the Farm. Once they get to the Farm, view spoiler [they finally use the Bowl that they spent the whole last book searching for hide spoiler ]. This scene is great, but I feel that it could have happened as part of the last book, making it even better. We could have done without pages of describing only a couple of hours riding on horses.

Even my favorite strand of the story, Egwene's, is so full of maneuvering that it is difficult to tell her group of Aes Sedai from those in the rest of the book although I think Egwene is brilliant and by far the best woman in the whole lot.

It just gets bogged down at this point, and there's not enough humor to counteract all the irritation that characters are feeling about each other. And the Sea Folk! I liked them when we first met them on the way to Tanchico but it turns out they are the most dreadful with their superiority claims. I am also not fond of the Perrin story at this point because he's in Ghealdan tracking down the Prophet and running into the Shaido. For some reason that's just not my favorite part of any of these books.

I'd like to move on. But not a whole lot happens with Perrin either, except for another new plot-line being introduced. It starts to seem like hours are weeks with how much detail we get on not a whole lot actually happening.

Then when we get to Rand, it's not just slow, but at a standstill. We find that Rand is avoiding going back to Cairhien, and he mainly sits on his horse in the middle of rainy battle against the Seanchan, surrounded by all of his political enemies, getting sick every time he tries to channel, raving at a madman in his head, and feeling sorry for himself.

It's one of the darker times that he goes through, and I can't wait for it to move on. The action does pick up a little at the end, when view spoiler [some renegade Asha'man try to kill Rand after he finally gets done with the battle hide spoiler ]. To top it all off, there's no Mat at all, and I missed him. A couple of important things do happen in this book, so I slogged through it, not wanting to miss any of those details that can be so important later.

I put it behind me with relief, though. The worst is over. The Path of Daggers [Nov 9, ] 32 60 Jan 08, Aug Week 4: Ch 24 - 31 Spoiler Discussion 5 14 Oct 02, Aug Week 3: Ch 15 - 23 Spoiler Discussion 1 3 Aug 14, Aug Week 2: Ch 7 - 14 Spoiler Discussion 1 4 Aug 14, Aug Week 1: Ch 1 - 6 Spoiler Discussion 1 5 Aug 14, Part 6 Chapters End 11 7 Jan 24, Readers Also Enjoyed.

About Robert Jordan. Robert Jordan. Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the Goodreads database with this name. Jordan was born in Charleston, South Carolina. He served two tours in Vietnam from to Librarian Note: He served two tours in Vietnam from to with the United States Army as a helicopter gunner. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross with bronze oak leaf cluster, the Bronze Star with "V" and bronze oak leaf cluster, and two Vietnamese Gallantry Crosses with palm.

After returning from Vietnam he attended The Citadel where he received an undergraduate degree in physics. After graduating he was employed by the United States Navy as a nuclear engineer. He began writing in He was a history buff and enjoyed hunting, fishing, sailing, poker, chess, pool, and pipe collecting. He described himself as a "High Church" Episcopalian and received communion more than once a week.

He lived with his wife Harriet McDougal, who works as a book editor currently with Tor Books; she was also Jordan's editor in a house built in Responding to queries on the similarity of some of the concepts in his Wheel of Time books with Freemasonry concepts, Jordan admitted that he was a Freemason. However, "like his father and grandfather," he preferred not to advertise, possibly because of the negative propaganda against Freemasonry.

In his own words, "no man in this country should feel in danger because of his beliefs. He later posted on his Dragonmount blog to encourage his fans not to worry about him and that he intended to have a long and fully creative life. Jordan was enrolled in a study using the drug Revlimid just approved for multiple myeloma but not yet tested on primary amyloidosis.

Jordan died at approximately 2: Jordan was cremated and his ashes buried in the churchyard of St. James Church in Goose Creek, outside Charleston. Other books in the series. The Wheel of Time 1 - 10 of 14 books. Books by Robert Jordan. Trivia About The Path of Dagge Quotes from The Path of Daggers.

The Wheel of Time Book 8. Now in development for TV! Since its debut in , The Wheel of Time R by Robert Jordan has captivated millions of readers around the globe with its scope, originality, and compelling characters. The Wheel of Time turns and Ages come and go, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth, and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth returns again. What was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow.

The Seanchan invasion force is in possession of Ebou Dar. Nynaeve, Elayne, and Aviendha head for Caemlyn and Elayne's rightful throne, but on the way they discover an enemy much worse than the Seanchan.

In Illian, Rand vows to throw the Seanchan back as he did once before. But signs of madness are appearing among the Asha'man. Perrin's beloved wife, Faile, may pay with her life, and Perrin himself may have to destroy his soul to save her. Meanwhile the rebel Aes Sedai under their young Amyrlin, Egwene al'Vere, face an army that intends to keep them away from the White Tower. But Egwene is determined to unseat the usurper Elaida and reunite the Aes Sedai.

She does not yet understand the price that others--and she herself--will pay.

TV series update: Rafe Judkins is attached to write and executive produce. Darren Lemke will also executive produce, with Jordan's widow Harriet McDougal serving as consulting producer. Product details Format Paperback pages Dimensions x x Other books in this series.

Add to basket. Towers of Midnight Robert Jordan. A Memory of Light Robert Jordan. The Gathering Storm Robert Jordan.

Knife of Dreams Robert Jordan. The Great Hunt Robert Jordan. Wheel of Time Robert Jordan. The Dragon Reborn Robert Jordan. Crossroads of Twilight Robert Jordan. The Shadow Rising Robert Jordan. The Fires of Heaven Robert Jordan. Lord Of Chaos Robert Jordan. New Spring Robert Jordan. Lord of Chaos Robert Jordan. Back cover copy "Robert Jordan has come to dominate the world Tolkien began to reveal.

Let the Dragon ride again on the winds of time.Rafe Judkins is attached to write and executive produce. The Daughter-Heir finally got to where she should have been since her mother's demise, and two of our favorite characters who got married at the end of the last book, are driving everyone insane by acting like love-sick teenagers But the problem here is that none of that makes for a compelling narrative.

Original Title.

There is much less of the repetitive backstory. Very few pages have been devoted to it, but I was enjoying it, especially once they started using the oath rod.

MARYANN from New Mexico
Feel free to read my other articles. I am highly influenced by horse racing. I do enjoy reading books nervously .