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SERVICE INNOVATION HANDBOOK PDF

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PDF | + minutes read | Intrigued by terms such as design thinking, Lucy Kimbell's Service Innovation Handbook brings together the latest. Woven into the Service Innovation Handbook are 14 methods and 3 recipes suggesting concepts and activities associated with the early stages of designing innovative services. Method 3 Mapping innovation ecosystems (PDF , MB). Case 2 Staging a different conversation about digital services at Microsoft. Method 1 Self-reflection (PDF, MB). Chapter 2 Contexts, strategies, value creation.


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Handbook for Service Organizations. By Lucy Kimbell ways to tackle issues they face in terms of developing and delivering services. what services are. Directed. Pre Order Free PDF The Service Innovation Handbook: Action-oriented Creative Thinking Toolkit for Service Organizations Pre Order Original. This books (The Service Innovation Handbook: Action-oriented Creative Thinking Toolkit for Service Organizations [PDF]) Made by Lucy.

In Sweden and Denmark, 3 pain points for customers, such as not understand- addressed this by making its billing more transpar- ing their phone bills, the packages they were ent — to reduce the burden on call centres and signed up to or their own usage. Freeman says this to increase customer satisfaction. To do this, 3 suggested an initial quick win, which the Fjord team 13 engaged service design consultancy Fjord. The project that resulted was not simply an example of using design to improve the transparency of interactions time of the month for all subscribers — we had to resist the urge to focus on redesigning the actual bill.

Instead, we came to the conclusion that we would be better off reinventing what a bill was, and create between customers and an organization. It can also a living bill using live data that the user could track be seen as an example of service innovation, since it throughout the month. For example, the team qualitative fieldwork.

As well as focusing on usage from the insights. To engage internal stakeholders, Fjord created a visualization of the service experience, relating the proposed new service to its business and design drivers.

They also created an early mock-up of the proposed live bill user interface on a phone that communicated the solution to senior executives.

In terms of impact, half of the users of the app said they called the customer service team less because of it. The result was a smartphone app service called While these metrics established that the mobile app My 3, launched in This presented users with was taken up and used by customers, more inter- an overview of their billing and usage using live esting is how the development of the app created data, and allowed them to look in more detail at a new service ecosystem for 3 and its customers.

Instead of being hidden and the service plan. Hence, although and allowances related to voice, messaging and the explicit driver for the project was to increase data. This term helps make clear that in this analysis, there are no such things as standalone objects.

Every object is connected to, and relies on, other kinds of device, or capacity, or locatedness within an environment or network, in order to have its capacities. Understanding how some hybrids are successfully held together as business offerings is useful when aiming to create new configurations when designing a new service offering. In contrast to the previously dominant model in which a customer buys a ready-to-use piece of furniture, IKEA involves customers in the transport and assembly of the furniture.

Firstly, the value for customers is realized in the collaborative exchange of resources in the value constellation that IKEA invites them to be part of.

IKEA configures the resources of suppliers of materials that are the components of pieces of furniture, and invites consumers to be active participants in a value constellation in which producers and consumers are connected in new ways. They are different customers in the sense that in the IKEA hybrid, they are constituted as customers-withcapacities, able to transport and assemble furniture. These days, many of us start research by searching online, which we imagine will give us a feel for the topic we want to understand.

Deciding on an approach is therefore not self-evident or neutral. It carries with it assumptions about what is valid as knowledge and how to go about creating it. We make the posters and videos. The general rule at the Creative Lab is to make as much stuff as possible and then you have something to deal with and something to talk about. Originally intended just for an internal audience, this video was later released to a wider public.

The team designing Glass then incorporated some of the ideas shown in the video into the design,. In the case of Glass, Google X briefed the Creative Lab team to develop stories for the device when it was still at an early stage. The recalls: In effect, the Creative Lab team became involved in designing Glass, by.

The response. One video, for example, tells the story of Alex Blaszczuk, who was left paralyzed after a car accident in and remains unable to use her hands.

Her Glass explorer story describes how the device enabled her to do things through using the voice activation functionality — a classic story of technology as an enabler for someone with particular needs.

Ed Sanders, head of marketing responsible for Google Glass, described this as a new way of doing marketing: In creating a video about someone using Glass, the Creative Lab made the strange familiar, and their concepts for value-in-use directly shaped the design of Glass.

Through the explorer programme, Google increased the variance of the participants involved in constructing Glass. Telling stories Use this structure to tell a story about the change you want to happen Use as many scenes as you need in each act to tell the story, resulting in perhaps 10 scenes.

Who is involved people and organizations , what they do, know, say or feel, where things happen, what touchpoints or technologies are involved? By the end of the decade, the technical specifications for 3G services were well-defined. Operators engaged in bidding wars to secure access to the radio spectrum that would carry these services. But managers, researchers and designers remained unclear as to what kinds of services consumer and business users would value.

The Service Innovation Handbook Solutions Manual

To focus the many ideas being generated inside their organization about what people might want from 3G services, the Swedish mobile operator Telia organized a research project with university students The students were given access to mobile devices that simulated 3G functionality, such as internet services on a mobile phone. After 12 days, participants generated ideas, which were then assessed by the company.

However, the Telia experts who evaluated the ideas found that either they were not original or not feasible, or both. Disappointed with the results, the team decided to go back and take one more look at the ideas that were original, but unfeasible.

One example was the following: For ethical, technical and legal reasons this idea was not feasible. The Telia team realized that they. In contrast, the delivery man concept was more like a remote control system that enabled users to undertake action at a distance. So the outcome of the research project with the students was not a set of original and feasible service concepts for Telia to develop. What it did, however, was open up a new conceptual space within which they could design 3G services.

Such reframing is a core activity for service innovation — part of the moves that happen as new concepts and new knowledge are generated.

Creating service concepts is productive, not just because some of them might be realizable as service offerings, but because sometimes they disrupt current assumptions.

Agarwal R. et al. (eds.) The Handbook of Service Innovation

This chapter grapples with the issue of how to make sense of concepts generated at the early stage of a project. It uses familiar words like prototyping, but shows how they mean something different in the context of service innovation where what needs exploring is new kinds of innovation ecosystem, not new kinds of object or software.

To do this, it illustrates how workshops — a format for people to come together to achieve some kind of advance in a project — can be events that unlock individual and group creativity and sense-making, as well as being opportunities for sharing information or making decisions.

Design games, hackathons, blueprinting and role play offer ways to. Case 11 continued Combining existing concepts and activities with new ways of doing things through design games at MindLab. Laura Winge, designer in the MindLab team, describes the challenge she faces when working with people who are specialists in an area with which she is less familiar: They bring their. As a designer, I constantly ask myself how we can make something better.

Our job is.

One of the results of playing the design game was that the. Although using metaphors like the magic straw introduced a risk of making the activity seem trivial,. Case 11 Combining existing concepts and activities with new ways of doing things through design games at MindLab.

Winge expands: If you as a teacher are going to plan the next annual cycle of work — and you simply have to use a magic straw — the chances are that you will laugh at the same time as taking it very seriously, and that you will find a new way of doing it. Following the game workshops, the civil servants digested their observations.

This led to MindLab. The outcome of playing the game, shaped by the interviews, fieldwork and workshops, was to generate the new concepts and activities to be built into the common objectives.

Although the game seemed extremely open, it was quite structured as to how it brought in these disruptions, which were meticulously planned and selected beforehand, even if we could not predict what people would do with them. The use of the design game staged a practical encounter. Creating a future outcomes framework Use this to define the desired outcomes for different segments and how you will know if they are achieved.

A member of the team starts talking frequently with someone from a partner organization who has a lot more knowledge, skills and data relating to aspects of the issue you are working on. You decide to commission some research to better understand the day-to-day realities and worlds of the people you want to serve and to identify their capacities and emergent behaviours.

You wish you had a bigger budget and more time. You organize a sprint that brings people together, including front line staff from a new partner organization, and this results in several different blueprints.

You wonder if there is something important you are missing. You argue about what matters and sometimes this prompts you to reflect on why this emerging project matters to you and to the other people involved.

The expanding team starts developing its own vocabulary to name the thing you are beginning to design. You discuss how to explore specific aspects of the emerging proposition and how best to do this. Later, you and others will create a business case with an associated financial model. You will define the opportunity, the proposition and the impact you think it can have and the resources required to make it happen. There will be presentations, workshops, documents to produce, and reports to review and update.

There will be meetings, water-cooler conversations, conference calls, more meetings and visits. The first sketch you did, which is still on the wall, looks wrong, but somehow right. Next to it is the comic strip. What do you do at the beginning?

You start doing things differently. But what was more valuable growth and profits. In Sweden and Denmark, 3 pain points for customers, such as not understand- addressed this by making its billing more transpar- ing their phone bills, the packages they were ent — to reduce the burden on call centres and signed up to or their own usage. Freeman says this to increase customer satisfaction. To do this, 3 suggested an initial quick win, which the Fjord team 13 engaged service design consultancy Fjord.

The project that resulted was not simply an example of using design to improve the transparency of interactions time of the month for all subscribers — we had to resist the urge to focus on redesigning the actual bill.

Instead, we came to the conclusion that we would be better off reinventing what a bill was, and create between customers and an organization. It can also a living bill using live data that the user could track be seen as an example of service innovation, since it throughout the month. For example, the team qualitative fieldwork.

As well as focusing on usage from the insights.

The result was a smartphone app service called While these metrics established that the mobile app My 3, launched in This presented users with was taken up and used by customers, more inter- an overview of their billing and usage using live esting is how the development of the app created data, and allowed them to look in more detail at a new service ecosystem for 3 and its customers. Instead of being hidden and the service plan. Hence, although and allowances related to voice, messaging and the explicit driver for the project was to increase data.

Here are some of the major themes: While facilitating, push Outcomes Add a visual dimension to this method by printing out in advance images such as photographs, screengrabs, drawings, and icons that you associate with future developments. Encourage them to speculate, imagine and be ridiculous.

Action-oriented creative thinking toolkit for services organizations

Mapping the user experience Customize the template to the context you are in. This is an example of big data — access to large numbers of digital transactions here, click-throughs and sign-ups , opportunities to BIS-LK-Ch4-v8. Working in well-defined interactions and scenarios of use. For example, media forms in an information-saturated environ- the team contributed to the principle that using ment provides additional constraints and focus.

In effect, the Creative Lab team became involved in designing Glass, by The Google X development team were prototyping making videos showing someone using the device, interactions with Glass, exploring questions such before it existed. The response Having developed the device to a beta prototype, from the Creative Lab was to make a video showing Google set up ways for wider publics to start using how someone like a creative in their team might use it in their day-to-day lives.

In addition to targeting it in his day-to-day life. Implications for the organization s involved Implications for the organization s involved Implications for the organization s involved Implications or requirements for the technologies involved Implications or requirements for the technologies involved Implications or requirements for the technologies involved BIS-LK-Ch5-v7. Another game to be creative in the process of coming up element of the game was a funnel, which allowed with ideas about how to use the new framework.

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About Lucy Kimbell. Lucy Kimbell. Books by Lucy Kimbell.

PDF The Service Innovation Handbook: Action-oriented Creative Thinking Toolkit for Service

Trivia About The Service Innov No trivia or quizzes yet. Welcome back. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account.Includes endorsements from professionals in the field of service innovation. This led to MindLab.

Our job is framework, and to come up with new ideas. It shows when and how to use these approaches, introduces specific methods, reviews their strengths and imitations, and finally helps managers think through what it takes to start using them in projects and within teams and develop the culture and behaviours that access the creativity they support.

See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. Why buy extra books when you can get all the homework help you need in one place? In this book I will adopt the term innovation ecosystems, which emphasizes how innovation as outcome results from the interconnections between actors of many different types, playing different roles and with mutual interdependencies involved in activities over time innovation as process. The best part? Interaction and service designers are attentive to the numerous artefacts or touchpoints that are part of an experience, and to the aesthetic qualities of experiences in which participants become immersed.

They are not rigid frameworks to be followed, but rather guides to help order idea generation and developing a shared understanding about issues and opportunities to address them.

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