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ALIVE PIERS PAUL EBOOK

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The #1 New York Times bestseller and the true story behind the film: A rugby team resorts to the unthinkable after a plane crash in the Andes. Spirits were high when the Fairchild F took off from Mendoza, Argentina, and headed for Santiago, Chile. On board were forty-five. Editorial Reviews. Review. “A classic in the literature of survival.” —Newsweek “ Read has risen Alive: The Story of the Andes Survivors - Kindle edition by Piers Paul Read. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or. "LOST A plane has crashed in the Andes mountains. The passengers are hopelessly lost in one of the most isolated places on earth. BANDONED lmost.


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On October 12, , a plane carrying a team of young rugby players crashed into the remote, snow-peaked Andes. Out of the forty-five original. Alive by Piers Paul Read, April , Lippincott Williams & Wilkins edition, of: Top Most Requested Print Disabled eBooks for California. Topics Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc, Aircraft accidents -- Andes Region, Cannibalism -- Andes Region. PublisherAvon.

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More filters. Sort order. Jul 06, Julio Genao rated it liked it.

View all 22 comments. This book surpassed the film, because Read did such a great job of involving the reader in the whole ordeal, including th "[The survivors] had neither sensationalized nor sentimentalized their own experience and it seemed important for me to tell the reader what they had told me in the same 'matter-of-fact' manner. This book surpassed the film, because Read did such a great job of involving the reader in the whole ordeal, including the plane crash survivors, their families, and the efforts others made to keep searching for the victims even when the odds of survival were dismal.

This edition had interviews with the author and two survivors thirty years after the publication of the book. It's really hard for me to believe that Read was only thirty-one years old when he was selected for this great project, even though he'd previously only written fictional novels. I also love that it was extremely fact based. Nowhere in this book is the reader told what they should feel about sensitive subject matter, and yet it was told in such a way that I felt involved—a spectator and visitor to the stranded fuselage that served as home to the survivors.

I'm glad I read this before I read Nando Parrado's personal memoir about the ordeal, Miracle in The Andes , although it will probably be some time before I can recircle this event. It really moved me to the core. Definitely a compelling read. Inspirational and gut wrenching. It's important to value the small things in life.

View all 13 comments. Sep 29, Hannah rated it really liked it Shelves: In October of , a chartered plane carrying 45 passengers and crew left Uruguay to travel to Chile. A majority of the passengers were made up of young men who were part of an amateur rugby team going to Chile for a game. Others included family and friends. Over the rugged Andes, the pilot made a fatal error, and the plane crashed into the side of a mountain, flinging parts of the tail section, fuselage, wing, rudder and even some passengers out over the desolate landscape.

The survivors were, In October of , a chartered plane carrying 45 passengers and crew left Uruguay to travel to Chile. The survivors were, for the most part, very young men average age around 23 years old. On average, they came from priviledged families. Most were devout Catholics. They enjoyed their cigarettes. They loved their mothers and girlfriends. They loved the game of rugby and were eager to experience a taste of the world outside their beloved Uruguay. Over the next 70 days, the remaining survivors battled cold, avalanches, injury, fear and hunger.

To survive, they prayed - alot. They devised plans for capturing water. They made forays into the vast white bleak landscape to search for supplies and a way out. They became makeshift doctors and surgeons and helped the wounded.

They waited for rescue to come from the outside. And to fight off starvation, they ate their dead. The story of the 16 remaining Andes survivors makes for riveting reading.

The first time I read this book I was in my early 20s myself, and I remember the cannibalism being the overriding memory I took away from this book. Now I'm older, and it's not the cannibalism that captures my attention, but how these very young men kept their sanity, faith and courage in the face of unimaginable horrors. Of their cannibalism, they are unapologetic which is as it should be.

However, they didn't take what they did to survive lightly, and one of the survivors says it best: For I can assure you that God is there.

We all felt it, inside ourselves, and not because we were the kind of pious youths who are always praying all day long, even though we had a religious education. Not at all. But there one feels the presence of God. One feels, above all, what is called the hand of God, and allows oneself to be guided by it And when the moment came when we did not have any more food, or anything of that kind, we thought to ourselves that if Jesus at His last supper had shared His flesh and blood with His apostles, then it was a sign to us that we should do the same--take the flesh and blood as an intimate communion between us all.

It was this that helped us to survive, and now we do not want this--which was something intimate, intimate--to be hackneyed or touched or anything like that It is a glimpse of courage and faith in the midst of death, fear, and hopelessness. Jul 01, Patti rated it really liked it.

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Not gonna lie--I read this book because I wanted to read about how they ate the people. That is what hooked everyone to this story, isn't it? I saw the movie to see how they ate the people.

It's what everyone remembers and why we remember the Donner party all these years later. In the book, they had already eaten the first people by about page 70; the book is hundreds of pages longer. Huh, I thought. What are they going to talk about for the rest of the book? What Not gonna lie--I read this book because I wanted to read about how they ate the people. What they talk about are the other aspects of survival and it is a very compelling read.

There was an avalanche shortly after the initial crash, there are a couple of treks to find the tail and to see who is hardy enough to attempt a walk for help. There are deaths and fights and camaraderie and heartbreaks and survival and yes, they eat the people. This of course begs the question of how far any of us would go to survive. Would I be able to take a piece of glass and cut the flesh off of a recently dead human being? I don't think there is any way to answer that without actually being in that situation which, God willing, I never will be.

And speaking of God, the boys' faith in God is awe inspiring. I sometimes snap at God when I get caught in traffic and these boys were faithful throughout although they, understandably, questioned why some lived while others died.

I will have to remember this story next time I get snappy. The only reason that I didn't give this book 5 stars is that I found the parts describing the parents' efforts to find the boys rather dull. I don't know if I just anxious to get back onto the mountain with the boys, but I found myself skimming those parts. I will say though that the reunions with the families were just amazing I can't imagine what the families went through and how full of awe they were to see their sons again.

One other thing I would have liked is to some sort of follow up to tell me what the rest of their lives turned out like, especially the older man who had the 4 kids and the boy whose sister and mother died in the crash or shortly thereafter.

Nevertheless, this was a compelling read I would suggest reading it in the summer though because parts of it made me feel kinda chilly!! View all 4 comments. Nov 30, Myrna rated it really liked it. I was a little obsessed with the movie Survive! Now, finally I've read the book! I'm glad I did! What a shocking story of survival, courage, endurance, and spirituality. This book is tragic but uplifting in many ways as " Nov 26, Rebecca McNutt rated it it was amazing Shelves: This was the frightening yet amazing true story of a team of rugby players trying to survive in the mountains against the dangers present.

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Only sixteen survived and were able to tell their story. Jan 24, Jim rated it really liked it Shelves: I read this when it first came out in PB, so many years ago, mid's.

I'd give it 5 stars because I still remember it so clearly, but I never wanted to re-read it. It was well done, but pretty gruesome. It's one of the most incredible stories of survival I've ever read. I wondered what happened I read this when it first came out in PB, so many years ago, mid's. I wondered what happened to the kids afterward. I wonder if it sheds more light on what the rest did. I'm not really sure I want to know.

That experience had to scar many of them badly.

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I hope the press was a bit easier on them in those days. Likely not There's a pretty good summary on Wikipedia: View all 5 comments. Haunting, haunting book. I read this too long ago to give a proper review but the account itself has stayed with me for years. Amazing story of survival against incredible odds.

Not for the faint hearted but truly gripping.

Some strong language and traumatic events. And by that I mean, plane crash, avalanche, death and cannibalism. Jan 09, Brendon Schrodinger rated it it was ok Shelves: I purchased this book looking for the facts and an account of the Fairchild Andes crash. What I got was an account, religiously biased, lacking certain facts when needed. Most of the passengers on the plane were related by being part of or supporting the football team of a religious institution.

So of course prayer and the talk of miracles would turn up. But when selecting a writing to tell the story they selected a fellow catholic.

I do not believe the author intentionally hid any facts, however I purchased this book looking for the facts and an account of the Fairchild Andes crash.

I do not believe the author intentionally hid any facts, however where there should have been an exploration of the caloric intake of the survivors and a thorough discussion on geographic locations of the wreckage and that of the attempted rescue, there was a bit too much page space given over to discussion on how religion helped the survivors. The facts that I was after I found on wikipedia.

One piece that was especially gratiing was that of the end justification of the use of psychics.

I would only recommend this book to a reader who was intensely interested in the events and who was christian. Anyone else, look for a more non-biased account of events. View all 7 comments. Jon Bon Jovi. The story itself is rather astounding - after a plane crash high in the Andes, which killed most on board and a subsequent avalanche which killed more , the remaining survivors lived for ten weeks on melted snow, human flesh and organs of the deceased and bone marrow and even intestinal contents, squeezed out and almost certainly would have died had not two of them climbed out of the Andes and found a neighboring valley and other humans, a trip which itself took ten days.

Read competed with o The story itself is rather astounding - after a plane crash high in the Andes, which killed most on board and a subsequent avalanche which killed more , the remaining survivors lived for ten weeks on melted snow, human flesh and organs of the deceased and bone marrow and even intestinal contents, squeezed out and almost certainly would have died had not two of them climbed out of the Andes and found a neighboring valley and other humans, a trip which itself took ten days.

Read competed with other, more well known writers, including Gay Talese, for the story; he thinks his youth, his Englishness, and above all his Roman Catholic faith was what got him the job. Most of the survivors were deeply Catholic and had overcome their resistance to anthropophagy by comparing it to the sacrament of Communion. There are fascinating details sprinkled throughout, such as what such a diet will do to you a bad combination of severe constipation and diarrhea , and the survivors wondering whether they ought to hide the partly eaten human remains scattered around the crash site so that their rescuers wouldn't think badly of them.

The eventual contact with outside human life and rescuers is quite moving; several of the survivors were so overjoyed at seeing plant life that they began eating flowers and grass. View all 3 comments. Sep 18, Jennifer Jacobs rated it it was amazing Shelves: If you could read just 10 books in rest of your life,this book is worthy of being one of them!

This is a book based on reality that shook the conscience of the world in s and even after almost 40 years past the incident,the book makes such a compelling reading! A football team hires a chartered Plane to play a friendly match across the Andes,due to co-piolt's mistake the plane crashes and our story begins, how they managed to survive is one of the all time great stories of them all!

They don't h If you could read just 10 books in rest of your life,this book is worthy of being one of them! They don't have enough food for 72 days obviously,what will they do to survive?

Of course our primary instinct as mammals is to survive and the fans and football players alike face this dilemma, before you judge them for what they did to survive,just ask yourself,what would you do if you were facing the same situation? It's such a controversial question and topic but for anyone who loves reality based or mountain hiking adventure type of books,this is a must read..

Once you start you won't stop and that's the bottom line coz Stone Cold said so Uhh okay,Jenny Jacobs said so!

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Dec 31, Missy rated it really liked it. Wow, what an incredible story. I had seen the movie a while back and thought I knew what happened, but the movie doesn't depict half of what went on up there in the Andes.

Along with what really happened from the parent's point of view with trying to get the gov't to send search and rescue people out, because nobody believed there could be anyone still alive, much less 16 of them. And what the pa Wow, what an incredible story.

And what the parents went through emotionally wondering if any of the 16 were their sons, and the sorrow of finding out theirs did not make it back, and on top of that, could have been one of the ones the majority of them who were eaten. Also the social and religious struggle each of them went through when faced with the thought that they would have to eat their dead friends to stay alive for a possible rescue. I read every interview in the back of the book after the story ended, and even looked up some websites as I could not get enough of this unimaginable story.

View 1 comment. Oct 24, Catharine rated it really liked it Shelves: One of the survivors in this book is quoted as saying that his experience of surviving following a plane crash in the Andes Mountains was the greatest experience of his life. All of the survivors suffered from severe cold, lack of food, and some had injuries,or infections, The test was severe, and yet, this young man could say that it was his greatest exprience. I think whenever we prove to ourselves how much we can handle, we grow and we can look back and say that the hardship, whatever it was, One of the survivors in this book is quoted as saying that his experience of surviving following a plane crash in the Andes Mountains was the greatest experience of his life.

I think whenever we prove to ourselves how much we can handle, we grow and we can look back and say that the hardship, whatever it was, has strengthened us and made us better. The book was well written and had a very interesting subject. The only thing that bothered me is that the author switched back and forth between using a character's first name and last name. As there were initially about 40 passengers on the flight, it was difficult to track exactly who was doing what. A chart at the end of the book of who survived and how each of the others died would have been very helpful.

Jun 07, Judy rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Around the World-ers. This book has to be one of the best examples of an author able to relate an account containing culturally taboo subject matter without judgment or sensationalism.

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The Story of the Andes Survivors recounts the survival story of a rugby team whose plane crashes in the Andes Mountains. Those who live find themselves confronted with awful choices that no human would want to make. Given up for dead by most of the world and even some of their families, they exist despite little shelter from the This book has to be one of the best examples of an author able to relate an account containing culturally taboo subject matter without judgment or sensationalism.

Given up for dead by most of the world and even some of their families, they exist despite little shelter from the cold, avalanches and with the knowledge that no search party will likely see them from the air or even have an idea where they crashed. This book is worth the read, but warn that some of the content is not recommended for the squeamish. View all 6 comments. Nov 15, Jen from Quebec: I had to sneak this from the school library as a young teen and read it since my parents wouldn't allow me to watch the film- until they caught me with this good book and finally relented Also, as a side note-- I forgot that it stars Ethan Hawke!

Feb 10, Katerina Charisi rated it really liked it. May 15, Walter Mendoza rated it it was amazing Shelves: Is a magnificent book, for a hard story, the story of rugby team from Uruguay, after your plane crashed on the Andes mountains in October of The story of the hope and fight for your lives. Masterfully written for Piers Paul Read, about the journey of survivors for save yourselves. They had to survive the elements, hunger, despair. The story of the determination of survivors to the accident for to be survivors.

One of the best books I have ever read. Definitely I recommend this book. Jul 28, Brenda rated it it was amazing Shelves: On Friday, Oct.

They had left home with much excitement on Oct 12th, but reports of bad weather in the Andes had put them down for an overnight stay in Mendoza. Most of the young men, with an average age of just 19, had never flown before, never been away from home, so they were extemely ex On Friday, Oct.

Most of the young men, with an average age of just 19, had never flown before, never been away from home, so they were extemely excited to be going to Chile. They set off again in the afternoon of the 13th, and contact was lost at approximately 3.

Initially the plane broke up, with the wing hitting the mountain first, and when they hit the ground, the tail separated from the fuselage, with those people at the rear of the plane dying instantly.

When the fuselage finally came to rest, there were 32 survivors left from the 45 who had boarded the plane in such high spirits. Some were severely injured, many had broken bones and other injuries. But there were some who were barely injured, and it was these who took the lead to help their friends. But the pilot made an error in calculating his position and started his descent too soon.

The plane flew into the side of a mountain. The wreckage of the cabin containing the dead, wounded and survivors came to rest at an altitude of meters. So begins a book which is anything but a light read.

It is not about flying and passion for aviation. Rather it is a story of a dogged determination to survive against all the odds. It is a behavioral analysis of the dynamics at play in the group of survivors, and the part played by their religion.

The book contains an extraordinary number of details as to how one can and must survive when there is no food available. Very soon after the crash it becomes clear to the group of survivors that they will not be found, despite the different searches that are surely being carried out.

They are therefore forced to decide how they are to assure their survival. After much discussion, they agree there is nothing for it but to resort to eating strips of flesh from the dead. As there are quite a few dead bodies already lying frozen in the snow, they surmise their supply would be sufficient until they could be rescued.

The survivors then have to endure yet more trauma when two avalanches claim a few more lives.It was never my intention to underestimate these qualities, but perhaps it would be beyond the skill of any writer to express their own appreciation of what they lived through. They don't h If you could read just 10 books in rest of your life,this book is worthy of being one of them! They held to their contention that soccer was a sport for the prima donna, whereas rugby football would teach the boys to suffer in silence and work as a team.

This story of the 16 survivors, what they suffered, and how they remained alive is one everyone should read.

Sep 29, Hannah rated it really liked it Shelves: View all 5 comments. Nando was gangling, nearsighted, and somewhat shy; Susana, while youthful and sweet in appearance and with a fine figure, had an earnest, unflirtatious expression on her face. Since all of the survivors frame their experience as a religious one, and since Read says the thing he had in common with them was their Roman Catholic beliefs, this is really not a book that's going to pick apart the survivors' practice and experience of religion--even if it were a book that had that kind of intellectual apparatus at all.

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