myavr.info Lifestyle Programming Ruby The Pragmatic Programmer Guide Pdf

PROGRAMMING RUBY THE PRAGMATIC PROGRAMMER GUIDE PDF

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The first edition of Programming Ruby was such a book; the second edition is The Pragmatic Programmers' Guide myavr.info 学习与工作中收集的一些资料. Contribute to wuzhouhui/misc development by creating an account on GitHub. As Pragmatic Programmers we've tried many, many languages in our search for tools to make our lives easier, for tools to help us do our jobs better. Until now.


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myavr.info This book is a new version of the PickAxe, as Programming Ruby is known to .. Hello, Ruby Programmer PDF summaries of the data she reads, but the PDF writing library she's. The Pragmatic Programmers' Guide. Second myavr.infoticprogrammer. com Three new chapters cover tools for the Ruby programmer: irb the Japanese PDF!), Guy Decoux, Friedrich Dominicus, Thomas Enebo, Chad Fowler. Programming Ruby (3rd edition). The Pragmatic Programmers' Guide. by Dave Thomas, with Chad Fowler and Andy Hunt. Ruby is the.

Feb 14, David rated it really liked it This book is huge and exhaustive, but it's very well organized. I went from knowing absolutely nothing about Ruby to writing useful programs for myself by the end of Chapter 4 about 50 pages. Ruby is a big language and I think it warrants a big book.

Big human languages like English allow concise and elegant speech. Big programming languages allow the same. But they do take longer to learn. Fortunately, Ruby has two things going for it in this regard: 1 It borrows a lot from other languages, This book is huge and exhaustive, but it's very well organized. Fortunately, Ruby has two things going for it in this regard: 1 It borrows a lot from other languages, so the more languages you know, the quicker you'll pick up Ruby.

Chapter 9 was my first big "ooooh! By the way, I think "module" is a really poor choice of word for this functionality and "mixin" has always sounded silly to me. That term dates back to the Flavors object system for Lisp and was taken from the ice cream industry.

But who cares what it's called - it's simple and its pragmatic and it works. That's the place where the object model of Ruby is explained. Without it, the rest of the book will seem to rely a bit too much on your faith. Unless, of course, you enjoy discovering the truth behind the magic for yourself. I'm sure it is possible and fun, but if you cannot spend the extra time, do take a peek at that chapter. Another warning If you are an experienced programmer wanting to learn Ruby, this book is for you.

Another warning: This enormous book covers most of what you want to know about Ruby, and everything you never wanted to know. Its overview of the language is decent but seems poorly organized.

It jumps back-and-forth between basic and advanced. Beginners would feel lost, while more advanced programmers have to skip around carefully. But if you don't skip around too much, you'll find nuggets that explain things much better than any other Ruby book.

15 Recommended Free Books to Learn about Ruby

It also covers tangential subjects that you won't find in most Ru This enormous book covers most of what you want to know about Ruby, and everything you never wanted to know. The best part of this book is the reference manual at the end. It's more thorough and organized than any other Ruby book I've seen.

I was disappointed with the so-called Pickaxe Bible. If you're looking for purely a reference book with some decent explanations, this book is great. It seems pretty exhaustive for beginner-advanced applications of Ruby and takes care to remain somewhat "framework" neutral by always listing both popular frameworks as well as alternatives.

However, a few things stopped this from being a great book: The examples were usually very contrived, I was disappointed with the so-called Pickaxe Bible. The examples were usually very contrived, it would have been great to spend more time giving examples of situations where you may want to use a certain language feature and give an example the reader can work along with.

The code examples were also inconsistently formatted.

Sometimes you'd have a 3-class example to clearly explain functionality, other times it would be a string of code snippets that felt like with a bit more effort they could have been woven into a more coherent example. A tutorial this book is not, but as a reference for those who have programmed before and want to answer the question "how do I do XXX in Ruby", this book fits the bill.

View 1 comment. May 09, Jenifer Hanen rated it liked it. Ok, so I have been teaching myself Ruby since last fall and I am in love with it. Back end web programming. Bless it. Back end, needs a compiler. Stil Ok, so I have been teaching myself Ruby since last fall and I am in love with it. Still beautiful. But Ruby on Rails can be a bit troublesome, opinionated, and locked into the framework.

Don't get me started on deployment. Makes PHP look downright friendly. Good book to get you started by experts in Rails. Jan 16, Dave rated it really liked it. This is my first exposure to this language; I like it. I'm happy to say goodbye to PHP fuck that language, it is made of garbage. I like it, seems pretty clear and goes through the language using several different strategies.

Seems to function well as both a beginner's guide, in depth tutorial, and reference: Even the Perl "camel book" 3rd edition in particular doesn't rea Actually I'm reading a downloaded PDF of the third edition that covers Ruby 1. Even the Perl "camel book" 3rd edition in particular doesn't really nail that, although it tries. View 2 comments. Sep 03, Eustaquio Rangel rated it it was amazing. A must read for every Ruby programmer. Feb 14, David rated it really liked it. This book is huge and exhaustive, but it's very well organized.

I went from knowing absolutely nothing about Ruby to writing useful programs for myself by the end of Chapter 4 about 50 pages. Ruby is a big language and I think it warrants a big book. Big human languages like English allow concise and elegant speech.

Big programming languages allow the same. But they do take longer to learn. Fortunately, Ruby has two things going for it in this regard: Chapter 9 was my first big "ooooh! By the way, I think "module" is a really poor choice of word for this functionality and "mixin" has always sounded silly to me. That term dates back to the Flavors object system for Lisp and was taken from the ice cream industry.

But who cares what it's called - it's simple and its pragmatic and it works.

Import a module's methods into a class and now the class has those methods. I like this kind of system. My book was the Second Edition, covering Ruby 1. And yes, it's sat on my shelf since it was current, I'm embarrassed to say.

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Some things had changed, but the authors did a great job of correctly predicting the changes. If you see an older copy of this for sale cheap and you want to learn Ruby, don't hesitate to buy it.

It's still completely relevant in Of course, it was slow and boring and I'm still going to have to look most of this stuff up later when I need it. Ruby has so much stuff built in, it's almost ridiculous in a good way. Ruby clobbers Perl in every possible category and looks good doing it. I can't believe it took me this long to join the fun! I use Ruby almost daily now. It and this book were everything I could have reasonably asked for.

Weird trivia: The binding is clearly the correct size, so I imagine a lot of copies went out this way. Do you. About Ruby 2. There are a number of additions to the standard library, including: Lazy , which adds support for lazy access to potentially infinite lists.

What You Need This book assumes you have a basic understanding of object-oriented programming. Ruby runs on Windows, Linux, and Macs. About the Author Dave Thomas is a cornerstone of the Ruby community, and is personally responsible for many of its innovative directions and initiatives.

Aug 27, Erik Mallinson rated it liked it Shelves: It's the definitive guide to Ruby, affectionately called PickAxe. You basically have to read it. Now that I have I've realized that it's a great resource for things but the first part of the book where Ruby is described in a tutorial style was totally useless to me. The examples were a bit boring and the stabs at humor should have really been left unstabbed.

All in all it was a perfect example of cookie-cutter programming books. The ability to search the book is totally remarkable and a life saver. I've also "printed to pdf" the books long reference section so I can just search within it instead of aforementioned beginning section.

Jun 18, D. A tour de force journey through the dynamic, object-oriented language known as Ruby, with over pages of new material and full descriptions of all the standard library modules. Covers strings, classes, blocks, and regular expressions with thorough examples. This book has such a reputation as the definitive reference for learning Ruby that it is simply called "The Pickaxe Book" in the programming community.

There are many Ruby tutorials and references on the web, but the beauty of this book is A tour de force journey through the dynamic, object-oriented language known as Ruby, with over pages of new material and full descriptions of all the standard library modules. There are many Ruby tutorials and references on the web, but the beauty of this book is that it is both well-written and provides a compendium of what you really need to know about Ruby that can't be easily sourced and collected.

This is the ultimate book for both learning Ruby and use as a desk reference.

Build a virtual bookshelf of free Ruby and Rails books

Apr 16, Piotr Zurek rated it it was amazing. It is the "go to" Ruby book for a reason. If you want to learn Ruby why wouldn't you? A number for things that I didn't quite understand earlier, have just "clicked" when reading this book.

Programming Ruby.The pragmatic programmer's guide

I definitely feel like knowledge I got from it was worth the time spend reading this book. If you're a complete complete Ruby novice like me you will want to read straight through the first 3 parts.

Part 4 is a dry Ruby Library Reference, so you may want to leave that out u It is the "go to" Ruby book for a reason. Part 4 is a dry Ruby Library Reference, so you may want to leave that out until you need something specific from it. If you know a bit about Ruby and programming in general you may simply refer to specific chapters for help in understanding specific topics.

The chapter on metaprogramming is a doozy. Mar 01, Clifford rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Very nice introduction to a very cool programming language. I like the way the author's started out explaining the language from the point-of-view of describing a hypothetical project that they were going to implement in Ruby and stuck with that metaphor throughout the book even in the more arcane 'Interfacing Ruby with C' sections.

The last pages or so is also essentially a very nice 'Ruby in a Nutshell' type reference so you get 2 books for the price of one: Overall, a very readable book on Ruby.

Jul 29, Fernando Fernandes rated it it was ok. This book lacks structure and organization. It constantly jumps from simple to complex examples and it's hard to get the author's intention. It's just too confusing.

In parallel, I'm reading Apple's Swift book. It's impossible not to compare. I'm not talking about the language, but how the books were structured. Apple targets the reader, making the programmer comfortable with the language. This book is the opposite. It made me feel uncomfortable with Ruby. I might use it as a reference book, but This book lacks structure and organization. I might use it as a reference book, but with the Internet, I doubt I'll be searching for anything here.

Well, time to reactivate my TeamTree House account May 12, Katherine rated it really liked it. Bought the new version from Pragprog.

The Pragmatic Programmers' Guide

Added a few errors on the errata list. Don't read this with an iPad. Go try the code samples.

Some may not work on 1. Overall I am happy to have spent time reading "what I assume to have always known" about Ruby.But who cares what it's called - it's simple and its pragmatic and it works. These appendices are now available for free in PDF , mobi, and epub formats—see the contents listing below. The Pickaxe contains four major sections: Not bad considering the topic it can be read and mostly used very easily. In Python 3 dict. It is the "go to" Ruby book for a reason. It's still completely relevant in Solid how-to and reference book.

This is the book I learned Ruby from, once upon a time, and while it has its detractors I still think it's a good tutorial especially if you know some other programming language, like Java.

Learn about the new parameter passing rules, local variable scoping in blocks, fibers, and the new block declaration syntax, among other exciting new features.

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