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THE FACEBOOK EFFECT EBOOK

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Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. There's never been a Web site like Facebook: myavr.info: The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World eBook: David Kirkpatrick: Kindle Store. Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. There's never been a Web site like Facebook: myavr.info: The Facebook Effect: The Real Inside Story of Mark Zuckerberg and the World's Fastest Growing Company eBook: David Kirkpatrick: . "Today - six years after it was created in a Harvard dorm room - over million people use Facebook regularly, in just about every country on earth. That a.


The Facebook Effect Ebook

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As Facebook spreads around the globe, it creates surprising effects—even becoming instrumental in political protests from Colombia to Iran. Today - six years after it was created in a Harvard dorm room - over million people use Facebook regularly, in just about every country on earth. That a. The Facebook Effect by David Kirkpatrick - Free download as PDF File .pdf) or read online for free. The Inside Story of the ISBN (ebook).

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The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That is Connecting the World

Return to Book Page. The Facebook Effect: The inside story of Facebook, told with the full, exclusive cooperation of founder Mark Zuckerberg and the company's other leaders.

In little more than half a decade, Facebook has gone from a dorm-room novelty to a company with million users. It is one of the fastest growing companies in history, an essential part of the social life not only of teenagers but hundreds of The inside story of Facebook, told with the full, exclusive cooperation of founder Mark Zuckerberg and the company's other leaders.

It is one of the fastest growing companies in history, an essential part of the social life not only of teenagers but hundreds of millions of adults worldwide. As Facebook spreads around the globe, it creates surprising effects—even becoming instrumental in political protests from Colombia to Iran. Kirkpatrick tells us how Facebook was created, why it has flourished, and where it is going next. This is the Facebook story that can be found nowhere else. How did a nineteen-year-old Harvard student create a company that has transformed the Internet and how did he grow it to its current enormous size?

Kirkpatrick shows how Zuckerberg steadfastly refused to compromise his vision, insistently focusing on growth over profits and preaching that Facebook must dominate his word communication on the Internet. In the process, he and a small group of key executives have created a company that has changed social life in the United States and elsewhere, a company that has become a ubiquitous presence in marketing, altering politics, business, and even our sense of our own identity.

This is the Facebook Effect. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. Published June 8th by Simon Schuster first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Facebook Effect , please sign up.

Oleksandr Golovatyi Yes, it's easy to read. Nice story, book is very interested. See all 3 questions about The Facebook Effect…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. May 14, Otis Chandler rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is a book that every entrepreneur definitely needs to read, and everyone who works even remotely with Facebook needs to read. It does a simply amazing job going behind the scenes of Facebook and describing where the site came from, how it got to where it is, and where it's going.

The author had amazing inside access to Mark Zuckerberg and other key Facebook employees and investors. Very smart of Facebook to include David so often - it makes their story fully open, which is consistent with th This is a book that every entrepreneur definitely needs to read, and everyone who works even remotely with Facebook needs to read.

Very smart of Facebook to include David so often - it makes their story fully open, which is consistent with the values of their company - not to mention good PR. The biggest takeaway I had was that Zuckerberg actually has much more of a vision and philosophy than I gave him credit for. The basic vision for Facebook is that it's a communication tool. It's very interesting to see that they think of it as a utility tool and not a media destination like MySpace no doubt does.

It means they are not afraid of sending traffic away from their site as long as they provide value up front - something that has been crucial to their success.

Zuckerbergs philosophy however is more interesting - he believes being open is better and will lead to a better society. He thinks the internet will inevitably enable this anyways, so Facebook might as well lead the charge. It's an interesting and idealistic philosophy - basically that it's really hard for a person to be dishonest or immoral in any way if their whole life is laid open to their friends.

In fact, one has to strive to be an even better person, because everything we do is not being tracked and if it isn't already online, it will be soon. The books we read, the things we buy, the people we date, the places we go, the people we associate with - all this is online, and defines who we are. Would my future children be proud of me if they examined my life's consumption? If I knew they were going to do so, would I make better choices? The chapter on privacy listed many of these horror stories, and I certainly know more than a few stories of people who have been burned by having an inappropriate photo on Facebook or tweeting something inappropriate.

The road to openness is happening - and I think Mark is right that it's going to make us better as a society. The danger, however, is that it will still cause many people a lot of pain as we get there - and may cause many to ultimately retreat from Social Networking and the internet. I think Mark knows his responsibility there as his service depends on it, and I hope he's a good steward, as this is certainly a topic we debate a lot at Goodreads.

I worked in Social Networking during the Rise of Facebook - my company, Tickle, is even mentioned a few times in the book. This book made the mistakes we made at Tickle even more apparent. Hindsight is a!

Facebook's biggest product innovation though was of course Platform. Followed perhaps by the Like button and Facebook Connect - which are really only possible because so many people use Facebook. Both were big wins, and were interesting pushed hard by Zuckerberg, and their success really validated him as a leader internally.

One interesting note that I hadn't considered was that because everyone uses their real names on Facebook, blogs that use Facebook Connect for comments eg Huffington Post don't have the troll problem as much, because of the openness issue see above. The book was also very interesting as it gave a lot of the details of how Facebook was financed, how the VC deals were structured, what sort of offers it got, etc.

Zuckerberg was courted to sell by so many large companies, I had always wondered how he had the nerve to say no - most in his shoes would have sold out for millions or billions long ago.

The answer seems to be that he doesn't really value money, and also that he knows this is his big Life's Opportunity to change the world - and to sell now would be to squander it. The book also gave interesting insight into where Facebook thinks they are going. In the future they think they will be less of a destination site, and more of a social communication enabler. Everything that can be social will be, and it will be done with Facebook. Every website you visit, your TV, video games, and perhaps even your cereal box will one day have Facebook Connect.

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Aug 04, Rebecca McNutt rated it it was ok Shelves: The Facebook Effect is interesting, but also comes off as very gimmicky and at this point dated. Written in , it hasn't accounted for Facebook's controversy in the past eight years, including all that "fake news" stuff, workers in Belgium who have to look at horrific reported content posted to the website and also the effect the website has on the kids who grew up with it.

To me though what I found bothersome was just the sheer level of corporate preaching embedded in the content. It might n The Facebook Effect is interesting, but also comes off as very gimmicky and at this point dated. It might not have been written by Mark Zuckerberg but if I didn't know any better I'd think it was.

After a while it just felt like I was reading a promotional pamphlet. On the bright side it does hold the history of Facebook and how it got to be as big as it did, which was intriguing. We get a good glimpse of many of the things that users of the social media giant enjoy about it, as well as some insight into why these websites are becoming more popular and prevalent in society. It wasn't one of my favourite books but I do think there's still some value to its content and that it would really appeal to people who like history, pop culture and technology.

It could also make a good comparison with a more current book on Facebook to see how swiftly it's changed between to Jun 26, Hesamul Haque rated it really liked it. Some people are genius, some people are ambitious, some people are lucky. Mark is all of the three. And life is all about people and Facebook helps you to connect with the right kind of people. This book is already slightly out of date, but it is a well-reported and engaging summary of Facebook's history and impact through When Kirkpatrick waxes about big picture issues, he is smart, strikes the exact right tone, and doesn't belabor his own points.

Not a Facebook user until , in reading this book I was most struck with how important Zuck's commitment to minimalism was to the company's early success. As its most successful competitors, Twitter and Tumblr, have a similar commitm This book is already slightly out of date, but it is a well-reported and engaging summary of Facebook's history and impact through As its most successful competitors, Twitter and Tumblr, have a similar commitment to simplicity and minimalism, I wonder if a return to minimalism may hold the key to Facebook's long-term viability as well.

This is a bit random, but I couldn't help noticing that Kirkpatrick described three of the very few women mentioned by name in the book as having "a round face": Robin Reed, early employee: Reed, middle-aged with short blond hair framing a round face and a New Age propensity to wear wooden beads wrapped around her wrist, wasn't interested. Ruchi Sanghvi, News Feed engineer: Ruchi Sanghvi, a beatific Carnegie-Mellon computer engineering graduate with a round face and long black hair.

Sheryl Sandberg, COO: Sandberg is an elegant, slightly hyper, light-spirited forty-year-old with a round face whose bobbed black hair reaches just past her shoulders. What the. No love for that roundest of heads Marc Andreessen? But Zuckerberg is more focused on 'getting stuff done' and convincing more people to use his service than he is on getting rich from it.

View all 7 comments. Nov 20, Cynthia rated it liked it.

An interesting read, though it was about twice as long as it needed to be. It is unbelievable the number of companies begging to put money by the millions into FB, and also amazing that the CEO Mark Zuckerberg has resisted so many opportunities to sell and become very wealthy - or to even go public with an IPO. Having been in the world of IT for so many years, I was blown away by the numbers of users being added every day - at one point a million.

Yes, a million. It sounds like they only had a c An interesting read, though it was about twice as long as it needed to be. It sounds like they only had a couple of data centers, all in the USA, though there are plans to build more. How they ever kept up with the server hardware and network demands is a huge part of the story - but not a point of interest for author.

Zuckerberg has a real long term view for the company - as recently attested to by their entry into the email business. I, however, have a hard time swallowing the majority of his views on how FB is and will be changing the world in fundamental ways - other than some interesting notes on political activism, particularly outside of the USA. View 1 comment. Dec 31, Michael rated it really liked it. Kirkpatrick's The Facebook Effect is a journalistic approach to the development and changes in Facebook as a platform and company since its inception.

The book is easy and fairly quick to read, and chock full of details. At times, I think it was a bit too heavy on advertising approaches and financial issues, but overall, it was enjoyable. The book also serves as a nice counterpart to the dramatized The Social Network , and provides some factual accounts that the movie glosses over, dramatizes, or Kirkpatrick's The Facebook Effect is a journalistic approach to the development and changes in Facebook as a platform and company since its inception.

The book also serves as a nice counterpart to the dramatized The Social Network , and provides some factual accounts that the movie glosses over, dramatizes, or changes for filmic and dramatic effect. Kirkpatrick spends a chapter chronicling the beginning of Facebook, from Zuckerberg's Facemash to the development of Thefacebook at Harvard, which he notes was "from the beginning driven by the hormones of young adults" with the ability to mark what one was "Looking for" and "interested in" Later chapters place Facebook in the context of other social networks at the time, explore how they got investors and advertisers, changes in the platform and reactions to those changes, the move from Harvard to California, and other issues and experiences.

One of the issues that Kirkpatrick discusses is privacy, and the constantly shifting privacy policies and new privacy issues that Facebook constantly dealt with as they rolled out new features.

Part of the reason people trust Facebook, Kirkpatrick claims, is that the platform relies on and requires a real identity. He quotes Chris Kelly, who heads privacy at Facebook: Zuckerberg also believes that to have multiple identities shows "al lack of integrity," and that the world is becoming more transparent, so it's pragmatic to have just one identity on a social networking site Zuckerberg also attributes people's willingness to be open and "real" on Thefacebook to the platform's orderliness: Kirkpatrick devotes an entire chapter on Privacy Chapter With almost every new feature, Facebook was critiqued for harming privacy.

For instance, the News Feed, which was developed to make content more easily accessible because before, you had to go to users' pages to see if they've updated , led to many feeling that Facebook was allowing for stalking. Facebook responded with new privacy features Facebook's platform itself gets a lot of attention in the book.

Zuckerberg had a vision of a platform where people would use it as they needed, and he understood Facebook as helping people "understand the world around them" and other people, not as a waste of time He called Facebook "a utility," attempting to get the platform out of the way so that people could just interact , Aaron Sittig, a graphic designer who worked for Facebook, said, "We didn't want people to have a relationship with Facebook so much as to find and interact with each other" This perspective is a bit ironic given how much they tried to create the "Facebook trance," where people would just keep clicking through Facebook.

In fact, the photos app that added was designed just for this: However, it's clear Facebook was about relationships, as the photos showed. Unlike Myspace, where photos were about self-presentation, on Facebook they are about showing relationships Zuckerberg seems to have a bit of a utopian perspective on Facebook, wanting to create a platform that could be the entire Internet experience.

Also, interestingly, there's a hope that Facebook could improve relations, that somehow getting more information about others "should create more empathy" and that Facebook works as a gift economy Overall, this was an enjoyable and easy read.

Kirkpatrick, David. New York: He chronicles its successes and missteps, and gives readers the most complete assessment anywhere of founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, the central figure in the company's remarkable ascent.

This is the Facebook story that can be found nowhere else. How did a nineteen-year-old Harvard student create a company that has transformed the Internet and how did he grow it to its current enormous size? Kirkpatrick shows how Zuckerberg steadfastly refused to compromise his vision, insistently focusing on growth over profits and preaching that Facebook must dominate his word communication on the Internet. In the process, he and a small group of key executives have created a company that has changed social life in the United States and elsewhere, a company that has become a ubiquitous presence in marketing, altering politics, business, and even our sense of our own identity.

This is the Facebook Effect. Toon meer Toon minder Recensie s Fast-paced. Toon meer Toon minder. Recensie s Fast-paced. One part is the exhaustively reported story of Facebook's founding and meteoric rise to near ubiquity; the other is a thoughtful analysis of its impact. The human drama of Mark Zuckerberg and his colleagues gives an exciting glimpse of how to launch a game-changing startup. His Life and Universe Kirkpatrick tells a gripping tale of how the company was created and came to such dominance.

As someone who followed the story almost from day one, I was still enlightened, entertained and sometimes dumbfounded by the rich detail and juicy goings-on. His reporting skills are impressive. A detailed and scrupulously fair history of [Facebook]. The Facebook Effect leaves you with a deep understanding of Facebook, its philosophies and, most startlingly, its power.

Mark Zuckerberg sought to maintain that hacker energy, and it 's fascinating to read what resulted. Is Zuckerberg a genius?

A flake? A bit of both? The book explains how his many facets fit together.

Recensie(s)

Lees de eerste pagina's. Reviews Schrijf een review. LouiseMarie Antwerpen 21 mei Toegankelijk Heldere uitleg. Geschreven bij Facebook Effect Ik vond dit een heel interessant boek, dat het ontstaan van Facebook zo objectief mogelijk vertelt.

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The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That is Connecting the World

Verkoop door bol.Zuckerberg was a more practiced programmer than Moskovitz, but he had never operated these kinds of programs before. At many colleges that year, students were pushing administrations to put student photo directories online. It is one of the fastest growing companies in history, an essential part of the social life not only of teenagers but hundreds of millions of adults worldwide. You could limit it to current students, just people in your class, or only those in your residential house.

Could we thus become less informed? That person could poke you back.

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