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Sci Fi Books Pdf

Author:SYREETA OBERMIER
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eBooks - Category: Science Fiction - Download free eBooks or read books online for free. Discover new authors and their books in our eBook community. PDF Drive is your search engine for PDF files. As of today we have 78,, eBooks for you to download for free. No annoying ads, no download limits, enjoy . Science Fiction books from before the 20th century are listed on the page Precursors of Science Fiction. The cutoff is more by author than by.

On a distant world, a teenager named Havu Flaa is coming to the end of his stay at a military installation run by a group of witches known as the Umbra-yin.

During Havu's trial, he discovers a latent power long thought to be extinct. The power of a lycan. This discovery sparks interest in Havu The year is The colony of Koorivar refugees from the destroyed planet Shouria has been established for two years now on Vancouver Island, on Earth.

The top physicist from that Koorivar colony suddenly has a stroke of genius which will change the future of Humanity forever. Now able to fly It appeared in the sky one summer night; the largest object known to man, it seemed abandoned, but why was it it here, was it the answer to man's technological craving.

NASA and the ESA came together to investigate it but what they found was not a back-engineering project, but something that In a world of magic and monsters, Kiran Kehomba aspires to become a great sorcerer like his grandfather. However, this budding wizard must for enter the Witching Tournament held every three years to qualify for his license.

And in order to to do that, Kiran will need to gather the ingredients to In the aftermath of genetic plague, human beings are transformed into white-eyed 'Happy' zombies, and the remnants of uninfected society live in heavily fortified compounds. One such group leader, , records in his diary the travails of day-to-day life over a winter where the water freezes and This is the perfectly modern, after school special.

This is a coming of age story for humans and tulpas alike. This is A group of half-human half-animal beings known as fauns are on the run from crazed hunter through the mountainside. However things take a dark turn when an alien ship lands in their area, its occupants set on completing their weapon at the cost of experimenting on the creatures of Earth.

At the Keila is the perfect revolutionary: She finds a ruin, where buildings collapse on scavenging citizens. All production has stopped. Nobody can leave, except as a corpse collected for fuel.

Suicide clubs flourish. Anna buys a trolley and wanders the city, salvaging objects and information.

She records horrific scenes, but also a deep capacity for love. This small hope flickers in a world where no apocalyptic event is specified. Instead, Auster creates his dystopia by magnifying familiar flaws and recycling historical detail: the novel's working title was "Anna Blume Walks Through the 20th Century".

NC Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Iain Banks: The Wasp Factory A modern-gothic tale of mutilation, murder and medical experimentation, Banks's first novel - described by the Irish Times as "a work of unparalleled depravity"- is set on a Scottish island inhabited by the ultimate dysfunctional family: a mad scientist and his unbalanced sons, older brother Eric, who has been locked up for everyone's safety, and Frank, the year-old narrator, tormented by a freak accident that cost him his genitals.

Frank's victims are mostly animals - but he has found time to kill a few children … Phil Daoust Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Iain M Banks: Consider Phlebas Space opera is unfashionable, but Banks couldn't care less. Consider Phlebas introduced the first of many misguided or untrustworthy heroes - Horza, who can change his body just by thinking about it - and a typically Banksian collision involving two giant trains in an subterranean station.

A magic carpet is the last refuge of a people known as the Seerkind, who for centuries have been hunted by both humans and the Scourge, a mysterious being that seems determined to live up to its name. When it all starts to unravel, the carpet people's best hope is a pigeon-fancying insurance clerk and his half-Seerkind companion.

Yes, it sounds twee, but as Barker himself said, "the Seerkind fornicate, fart - they're very far from pure".

PD Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Nicola Barker: Darkmans Nicola Barker has been accused of obscurity, but this Booker-shortlisted comic epic has a new lightness of touch and an almost soapy compulsiveness.

Set in Ashford, Kent, the kind of everytown that has turned its back on history, the novel dips into the lives of a loosely connected cast of everyday eccentrics who find that history - in the persona of Edward IV's jester - is fighting back.

The 26 most underrated sci-fi books (free PDF)

A jumble of voices and typefaces, mortal fear and sarky laughter, the novel is as true as it is truly odd, and beautifully written to boot. He sends him back to the far future in an attempt to save the Eloi woman Weena, only to find himself in a future timeline diverging from the one he left. Baxter's extraordinary continuation and expansion tackles the usual concerns of the time-travel story - paradox and causality - and goes on to explore many of the themes that taxed Wells: destiny, morality and the perfectibility of the human race.

EB Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Greg Bear: Darwin's Radio Bear combines intelligence, humour and the wonder of scientific discovery in a techno-thriller about a threat to the future of humanity. A retro-viral plague sweeps the world, infecting women via their sexual partners and aborting their embryos. But the plague is more than it seems What might in other hands have been a mere end-of-the-world runaround is transformed by Bear's scientific knowledge into something marvellous, as reason overcomes paranoia and fear.

Somehow surviving, he swiftly gets down to it. Bester's novel updates The Count of Monte Cristo with telepathy, nuclear weapons and interplanetary travel. Those who stumble across it are inevitably surprised to find it was written half a century ago. PD Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Poppy Z Brite: Lost Souls Brite's first novel, a lush, decadent and refreshingly provocative take on vampirism told in rich, stylish prose, put her at the forefront of the s horror scene.

It's the story of Nothing, an angst-filled teenager who runs away from his adoptive parents to seek out his favourite band. Along the way he joins up with a group of vampires, finds his true family and discovers what he really values, amid much blood, sex, drugs and drink.

Keith Brooke Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Algis Budrys: Rogue Moon Al Barker is a thrillseeking adventurer recruited to investigate an alien labyrinth on the moon. Everyone who enters the maze dies, so Barker's doppelganger is transmitted there while he remains in telepathic contact.

Science Fiction (Bookshelf)

Barker is the first person to survive the trauma of witnessing their own death, returning again and again to explore. Rogue Moon works as both thriller and character study, a classic novel mapping out a new and sophisticated SF, just as Barker maps the alien maze. KB Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Mikhail Bulgakov: The Master and Margarita When the Devil comes to s Moscow, his victims are pillars of the Soviet establishment: a famous editor has his head cut off; another bureaucrat is made invisible.

This is just a curtain-raiser for the main event, however: a magnificent ball for the damned and the diabolical. For his hostess, his satanic majesty chooses Margarita, a courageous young Russian whose lover is in a psychiatric hospital, traumatised by the banning of his novel. No prizes for guessing whom Bulgakov identified with; although Stalin admired his early work, by the s he was personally banning it.

This magisterial satire was not published until more than 20 years after the writer's death. PD Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Edward Bulwer-Lytton: The Coming Race In this pioneering work of British science fiction, the hero is a bumptious American mining engineer who stumbles on a subterranean civilisation.

The "Vril-ya" enjoy a utopian social organisation based on "vril", a source of infinitely renewable electrical power commerce promptly produced the beef essence drink, Bovril. Also present are ray guns, aerial travel and ESP.

Ironically, the hero finds utopia too boring. He is rescued from death by the Princess Zee, who flies him to safety. The novel ends with the ominous prophecy that the superior race will invade the upper earth - "the Darwinian proposition", as Bulwer-Lytton called it.

John Sutherland Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Anthony Burgess: A Clockwork Orange One of a flurry of novels written by Burgess when he was under the mistaken belief that he had only a short time to live. Set in a dystopian socialist welfare state of the future, the novel fantasises a world without religion.

Alex is a "droog" - a juvenile delinquent who lives for sex, violence and subcult high fashion. The narrative takes the form of a memoir, in Alex's distinctive gang-slang. The state "programmes" Alex into virtue; later deprogrammed, he discovers what good and evil really are. The novel, internationally popularised by Stanley Kubrick's film into what Burgess called "Clockwork Marmalade", is Burgess's tribute to his cradle Catholicism and, as a writer, to James Joyce.

JS Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Anthony Burgess: The End of the World News In one of the first split-screen narratives, Burgess juxtaposes three key 20th-century themes: communism, psychoanalysis and the millennial fear of Armageddon. Trotsky's visit to New York is presented as a Broadway musical; a mournful Freud looks back on his life as he prepares to flee the Nazis; and in the year , as a rogue asteroid barrels towards the Earth, humanity argues over who will survive and what kind of society they will take to the stars.

There, surrounded by four-armed, green-skinned warriors, ferocious white apes, eight-legged horse-substitutes, legged "dogs", and so on, he falls in love with Princess Dejah Thoris, who might almost be human if she didn't lay eggs. She is, naturally, both beautiful and extremely scantily clad Burroughs's first novel, published in serial form, is the purest pulp, and its lack of pretension is its greatest charm.

PD Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop William Burroughs: Naked Lunch Disjointed, hallucinatory cut-ups form a collage of, as Burroughs explained of the title, "a frozen moment when everyone sees what is on the end of every fork".

A junkie's picaresque adventures in both the real world and the fantastical "Interzone", this is satire using the most savage of distorting mirrors: society as an obscene phantasmagoria of addiction, violence, sex and death. Only Cronenberg could have filmed it in , and even he recreated Burroughs's biography rather than his interior world. JJ Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Octavia Butler: Kindred Butler's fourth novel throws African American Dana Franklin back in time to the early s, where she is pitched into the reality of slavery and the individual struggle to survive its horrors.

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Butler single-handedly brought to the SF genre the concerns of gender politics, racial conflict and slavery.

Several of her novels are groundbreaking, but none is more compelling or shocking than Kindred. A brilliant work on many levels, it ingeniously uses the device of time travel to explore the iniquity of slavery through Dana's modern sensibilities.

The hero Higgs finds himself in New Zealand as, for a while, did the chronic misfit Butler. Assisted by a native, Chowbok, he makes a perilous journey across a mountain range to Erewhon say it backwards , an upside-down world in which crime is "cured" and illness "punished", where universities are institutions of "Unreason" and technology is banned.

The state religion is worship of the goddess Ydgrun ie "Mrs Grundy" - bourgeois morality. Does it sound familiar? Higgs escapes by balloon, with the sweetheart he has found there.

JS Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Italo Calvino: The Baron in the Trees It is a boy quarrels with his aristocratic parents and climbs a tree, swearing not to touch the earth again. He ends up keeping his promise, witnessing the French revolution and its Napoleonic aftermath from the perspective of the Italian treetops.

Drafted soon after Calvino's break with communism over the invasion of Hungary, the novel can be read as a fable about intellectual commitments. At the same time, it's a perfectly turned fantasy, densely imagined but lightly written in a style modelled on Voltaire and Robert Louis Stevenson.

Chris Tayler Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Ramsey Campbell: The Influence Campbell has long been one of the masters of psychological horror, proving again and again that what's in our heads is far scarier than any monster lurking in the shadows. In this novel, the domineering old spinster Queenie dies - a relief to those around her.

Her niece Alison inherits the house, but soon starts to suspect that the old woman is taking over her eight-year-old daughter Rowan. A paranoid, disturbing masterpiece. KB Buy this book at the Guardian bookshop Lewis Carroll: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland The intellectuals' favourite children's story began as an improvised tale told by an Oxford mathematics don to a colleague's daughters; later readers have found absurdism, political satire and linguistic philosophy in a work that, years on, remains fertile and fresh, crisp yet mysterious, and endlessly open to intepretation.

Alice, while reading in a meadow, sees a white rabbit rush by, feverishly consulting a watch. She follows him down a hole Freudian analysis, as elsewhere in the story, is all too easy , where she grows and shrinks in size and encounters creatures mythological, extinct and invented. Morbid jokes and gleeful subversion abound. More donnish in tone, this fantasy follows Alice into a mirror world in which everything is reversed.

Her journey is based on chess moves, during the course of which she meets such figures as Humpty Dumpty and the riddling twins Tweedledum and Tweedledee.Chambers Robert W. All production has stopped. Mar Downloads: By using the website you agree to the use of cookies. Click the Donate button and support Open Culture.

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