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MACROMEDIA FLASH 8 BIBLE PDF

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Flash 8 ActionScript bible / Joey Lott and Robert Reinhardt. p. cm. Includes index. Macromedia, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries. All other. [BOOKS] Macromedia Flash 8 Bible by Robert Reinhardt. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Macromedia. Macromedia Flash8 Bible,, (isbn , ean ), have the option of downloading most of the reference manuals in PDF format for future .


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Written by two of the industry's top Flash experts, this new edition of the best- selling classic has been revised and enhanced to cover the very latest release of . Items 1 - 24 of 24 PDF Flash 8 ActionScript Bible at Complete PDF Library. download and read macromedia flash mx [PDF] A Breath Of Fresh myavr.info Macromedia Flash 8: Training from the Source. Read more · Developing Extensions for Macromedia Flash 8 Macromedia Flash MX ActionScript Bible.

Do you need more help but are not sure where to start? Do you have skills that you'd like to share with others?

This link will take you to the main info site for Macromedia's Training and Certification programs: Here, you can find out more about becoming a training partner, find books and certified instructors, or download self-paced courses for any of the Studio 8 applications. If you are connected to the Internet, you can browse the Flash Exchange for helpful tools and add-ons that Flash developers have made available through Macromedia's site.

Help Menu Options The Flash Help menu is your gateway to local versions of the documentation and examples on Macromedia's support site. The tabbed interface introduced in Flash MX has been dropped in favor of a centralized list. Rather than clicking back and forth between two different Help modes, you can now browse or search a listing of available Help topics and use the new drop-down menu to choose the "books," or categories of Help content, you want to view.

An accordion divider separates the main reference content from the table of contents or book listings that will expand or collapse to show sublistings as you use the control icons at the top of the panel. You can also navigate books and subcategories using the expand and collapse arrows on the left edge of the book list.

To adjust the division of the book list and the content area shown in Figure , simply hover over the dividing line until you see a dual arrow cursor; then drag the divider until you're happy with the panel split. The streamlined Flash 8 Help panel includes a drop-down menu to help you sort a list of reference categories or "books," and a search field to find content on specific topics.

If you don't want to muddle around in the Help panel, the Flash application Help menu offers quick shortcuts to commonly used reference content. Unless you've removed the help files from your Flash installation, you can access a number of offline resources directly from the Help menu. These resource topics will launch the Help panel and load the offline HTML content you have requested. First, have a look at the What's New in Flash 8 link to get an overview of the new features.

Next, if you're a new user, you may want to browse the tutorial content for general Flash tasks under Getting Started with Flash. Opens the Help panel. Set the drop-down menu to show All books to browse through a comprehensive list of help topics, or use the Search button to find a specific term or task.

Opens the Help panel at the beginning of a comprehensive series of descriptions and examples to help you get started with common Flash tasks. Loads the online version of the most recently updated Flash help files with comments and notes from other Flash users.

Accesses summary text introducing new features of Flash Basic 8 and Flash Professional 8. Although it is not included in the application Help menu, the ActionScript 2. The guide includes a series of documents with detailed information on various aspects of the ActionScript language with notes on syntax changes in the latest version and information you need to know if you want to update old Flash files to work with Flash Player 8. Macromedia has also included guided entry points to a vast array of online resources.

The Flash Exchange is an online resource created to support use and development of Flash extensions. It is a great place to look for new tools, components, and effects that you can download and add to your Flash toolkit.

This is Macromedia's primary vehicle for the distribution of up-to-date information about Flash and Flash-related topics.

It is a searchable area with current and archived articles on many Flash topics. You can also find links to downloads, documentation, forums, and many other invaluable Flash-related resources and updates.

The Help panel can be docked with other panels in your workspace, but it is much easier to read or search for help content if you undock the panel and drag the size box horizontally to make it wider. Use the keyboard shortcut F1 to show or hide the Help panel whenever you need to. The Flash 8 Interface on Macintosh and Windows Before discussing the various Flash menu items, panels, and miscellaneous dialog boxes that you can use to control and customize your workspace, we begin with a look at the interface with its default array of toolbars and panels as they appear on Macintosh and Windows.

The implementation of panels is consistent across both Mac and Windows. Throughout the book, we discuss each panel in context with the tools and tasks where it is used. As you'll quickly find, there are many ways to arrange these panels for a customized workflow.

Your preferred panel layouts for different tasks can be saved as custom Workspace Layouts and recalled from the Workspace Layouts menu. In Flash MX , a specific arrangement of panels in the authoring environment was called a Panel Set. In Flash 8, this is now called a Workspace Layout. Flash 8 does not ship with pre-arranged Developer and Designer layouts but you can still save and load your own custom sets for different tasks.

Editorial Reviews

The default Workspace Layout includes two modified panel groups that have been introduced to support new features and reduce clutter in Flash 8: The expanded Library panel also includes a new drop-down menu for loading Library content from different documents without having to manage multiple floating panels. Figure shows how the same panel set looks on Windows with the Professional version of Flash 8.

Although there are some visible differences between Macintosh and Windows interfaces for Flash 8, these are largely due to differences in the operating systems that are apparent in any application.

For the sake of clarity, we've compared the two overall interfaces here showing a default panel layout for each version of the program before discussing individual UI items. For the most part, however, we use Macintosh OS X and Windows XP illustrations inter-changeably, pointing out differences only when they directly affect workflow.

One minor way in which the Windows version differs from the Mac version is that the Tools panel and the Controller can be docked or undocked to the program window. The Tools panel and Controller can be dragged to the edge of the program window to dock seamlessly in the Windows interface.

Note that the Tools panel docks only to the sides, while the Controller can also dock to the top and bottom, as well as mesh with other toolbars. To prevent docking while moving either the Tools panel or Controller, press the Control key while dragging.

For clarity, we have capitalized terms that refer to specific Flash interface features such as Document window, Stage, Timeline, Workspace Layout, Tools panel, and Options area. Search for it in the Flash Help panel with the menu set to "All books. The Start Page for Flash Basic 8 will show fewer file types in the Create New list, but still functions as a quick access point to recent items, templates, and Macromedia resources.

Figure The Start Page provides quick access to file lists, templates, and resource links. New Feature Flash content for mobile phones is increasingly popular, and Macromedia supports developers with a whole suite of new templates designed specifically for phones. By default, the Start Page should appear when you first launch Flash and any time you close all Document windows while the program is running.

After you have opened or created a new file, the Start Page automatically closes to make room on your desktop. This leaves you with the more limited, but familiar, option of using the application File menu or shortcut keys to create and open files. The links at the bottom of the Start Page connect you to the built-in Help system in Flash as well as to online content available through the Macromedia Web site. These links are worth investigating if you want to get a quick introduction to Flash: Take a quick tour of Flash: This link launches your default Web browser and loads an orientation presentation from Macromedia.

The presentation includes audio and images, so make sure you have your speakers or your headphones on when you connect. Web Resource You don't need to have Flash installed to view this presentation. If you would like to introduce other friends or co-workers to the new features of Flash 8, you can direct them to the presentation online at www.

Learn about Flash documentation resources: This link directs you to the support section of Macromedia's Web site. The documentation for Flash has grown with each release and the support site is a good way to find your way through the online manuals, tutorials, and example files available for Flash users at different levels. Web Resource You do need to be connected to the Internet to access Macromedia's support site: www.

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Find authorized training: Do you need more help but are not sure where to start? Do you have skills that you'd like to share with others?

This link will take you to the main info site for Macromedia's Training and Certification programs: www. Here, you can find out more about becoming a training partner, find books and certified instructors, or download self-paced courses for any of the Studio 8 applications.

If you are connected to the Internet, you can browse the Flash Exchange for helpful tools and add-ons that Flash developers have made available through Macromedia's site.

Help Menu Options The Flash Help menu is your gateway to local versions of the documentation and examples on Macromedia's support site. The tabbed interface introduced in Flash MX has been dropped in favor of a centralized list. Rather than clicking back and forth between two different Help modes, you can now browse or search a listing of available Help topics and use the new drop-down menu to choose the "books," or categories of Help content, you want to view.

An accordion divider separates the main reference content from the table of contents or book listings that will expand or collapse to show sublistings as you use the control icons at the top of the panel.

You can also navigate books and subcategories using the expand and collapse arrows on the left edge of the book list. To adjust the division of the book list and the content area shown in Figure , simply hover over the dividing line until you see a dual arrow cursor; then drag the divider until you're happy with the panel split. Figure The streamlined Flash 8 Help panel includes a drop-down menu to help you sort a list of reference categories or "books," and a search field to find content on specific topics.

If you don't want to muddle around in the Help panel, the Flash application Help menu offers quick shortcuts to commonly used reference content. Unless you've removed the help files from your Flash installation, you can access a number of offline resources directly from the Help menu. These resource topics will launch the Help panel and load the offline HTML content you have requested. First, have a look at the What's New in Flash 8 link to get an overview of the new features. Next, if you're a new user, you may want to browse the tutorial content for general Flash tasks under Getting Started with Flash.

Getting Started

Set the drop-down menu to show All books to browse through a comprehensive list of help topics, or use the Search button to find a specific term or task. Tip Although it is not included in the application Help menu, the ActionScript 2. The guide includes a series of documents with detailed information on various aspects of the ActionScript language with notes on syntax changes in the latest version and information you need to know if you want to update old Flash files to work with Flash Player 8.

Macromedia has also included guided entry points to a vast array of online resources. The Flash Exchange is an online resource created to support use and development of Flash extensions. It is a great place to look for new tools, components, and effects that you can download and add to your Flash toolkit.

This is Macromedia's primary vehicle for the distribution of up-to-date information about Flash and Flash-related topics. It is a searchable area with current and archived articles on many Flash topics. First, have a look at the What's New in Flash 8 link to get an overview of the new features. Next, if you're a new user, you may want to browse the tutorial content for general Flash tasks under Getting Started with Flash.

Set the drop-down menu to show All books to browse through a comprehensive list of help topics, or use the Search button to find a specific term or task.

Tip Although it is not included in the application Help menu, the ActionScript 2. The guide includes a series of documents with detailed information on various aspects of the ActionScript language with notes on syntax changes in the latest version and information you need to know if you want to update old Flash files to work with Flash Player 8. Macromedia has also included guided entry points to a vast array of online resources.

The Flash Exchange is an online resource created to support use and development of Flash extensions. It is a great place to look for new tools, components, and effects that you can download and add to your Flash toolkit. This is Macromedia's primary vehicle for the distribution of up-to-date information about Flash and Flash-related topics.

It is a searchable area with current and archived articles on many Flash topics. You can also find links to downloads, documentation, forums, and many other invaluable Flash-related resources and updates. Tip The Help panel can be docked with other panels in your workspace, but it is much easier to read or search for help content if you undock the panel and drag the size box horizontally to make it wider.

Use the keyboard shortcut F1 to show or hide the Help panel whenever you need to.

The Flash 8 Interface on Macintosh and Windows Before discussing the various Flash menu items, panels, and miscellaneous dialog boxes that you can use to control and customize your workspace, we begin with a look at the interface with its default array of toolbars and panels as they appear on Macintosh and Windows. The implementation of panels is consistent across both Mac and Windows.

Throughout the book, we discuss each panel in context with the tools and tasks where it is used. As you'll quickly find, there are many ways to arrange these panels for a customized workflow. Your preferred panel layouts for different tasks can be saved as custom Workspace Layouts and recalled from the Workspace Layouts menu.

In Flash 8, this is now called a Workspace Layout. Flash 8 does not ship with pre-arranged Developer and Designer layouts but you can still save and load your own custom sets for different tasks. New Feature The default Workspace Layout includes two modified panel groups that have been introduced to support new features and reduce clutter in Flash 8: a Property inspector with tabs for Properties, Parameters, and Filters and a Color panel group that puts the Color Mixer panel and the Color swatches panel into a handy tabbed layout.

The expanded Library panel also includes a new drop-down menu for loading Library content from different documents without having to manage multiple floating panels. Figure shows how the same panel set looks on Windows with the Professional version of Flash 8. Figure The default layout for Flash Professional 8 as it appears on Macintosh OS X Figure The default layout for Flash Professional 8 as it appears on Windows XP Note Although there are some visible differences between Macintosh and Windows interfaces for Flash 8, these are largely due to differences in the operating systems that are apparent in any application.

For the sake of clarity, we've compared the two overall interfaces here showing a default panel layout for each version of the program before discussing individual UI items. For the most part, however, we use Macintosh OS X and Windows XP illustrations inter-changeably, pointing out differences only when they directly affect workflow.

Macromedia Flash 8 Bible

One minor way in which the Windows version differs from the Mac version is that the Tools panel and the Controller can be docked or undocked to the program window. The Tools panel and Controller can be dragged to the edge of the program window to dock seamlessly in the Windows interface. Note that the Tools panel docks only to the sides, while the Controller can also dock to the top and bottom, as well as mesh with other toolbars.

To prevent docking while moving either the Tools panel or Controller, press the Control key while dragging. For clarity, we have capitalized terms that refer to specific Flash interface features such as Document window, Stage, Timeline, Workspace Layout, Tools panel, and Options area. You may see these words lowercase in other parts of the text, where they are used as general terms rather than as labels for specific parts of the Flash interface.

The Flash 8 Window menu puts all of the main panels and UI items back into the main list with only a few "special" panels grouped in an Other Panels subfolder. Thank you Macromedia — fewer mouse miles are always a good thing! We describe the actual uses and options for most of these various interface elements in the context of where the elements are applied. To get started with Flash, we will introduce the Property inspector, Tools panel, Document window, Scene panel, Timeline, and Controller, along with the related menu items.

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We discuss the remainder of the panels and windows, and how they are used, in chapters on drawing, animation, interactivity, and other specific production topics. Note The Main toolbar is an optional feature only available on the Windows version of Flash. This toolbar gives you quick access to commonly used tool and panel options and it should not be confused with the Tools panel.

The Controller and the Edit bar options found in the Toolbars menu have the same function on Windows and Mac versions.This is Macromedia's primary vehicle for the distribution of up-to-date information about Flash and Flash-related topics.

The presentation includes audio and images, so make sure you have your speakers or your headphones on when you connect. As shown in Figure , when an element is selected that can have code attached to it, a gray arrow appears on the right edge of the Property inspector. We begin by introducing the Flash interface and pointing out the tools available for managing and customizing your Flash "studio. The Tools panel and Controller can be dragged to the edge of the program window to dock seamlessly in the Windows interface.

This link will take you to the main info site for Macromedia's Training and Certification programs: www.

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