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CODE SIMPLICITY PDF

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O'Reilly Media, Inc. Code Simplicity, the cover image of a ring dove, and .. Sometimes a lot of code actually leads to simplicity; it just means. Code Simplicity: The Science of Software Development. Home · Code The Laws of Simplicity (Simplicity: Design, Technology, Business, Life) · Read more. Points will be fast, but still important. – More detail on everything at my blog: http:// myavr.info ○ Some of these things you may already know.


Code Simplicity Pdf

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This concise guide helps you understand the fundamentals of good design through scientific laws—principles you can apply to any programming language or. Free download page for Project garyProject00's myavr.info myavr.info Code Simplicity - (Author: Max Kanat-Alexander). (Literal summary) Programming has to become the art of reducing complexity to simplicity. Otherwise.

This means that programs can still go wrong because of properties that are not tracked by the type-checker, and that there are programs that while they cannot go wrong cannot be type-checked. This is like trying to run a marathon with a ball and chain tied to your leg and triumphantly shouting that you nearly made it even though you bailed out after the first mile.

Data around bug density suggests that their conclusions are accurate. The mere fact that we no longer code in machine language is a testament to the success of this endeavor.

While we have removed a lot of accidental complexity, the core complexity inherent in systems remains. We can see a modern-day example of this with React JS.

One of the main intentions of React is to abstract away the DOM. However, React provides refs for those cases where you may need to interact with the DOM.

To do so, of course, you must understand how to interact with the DOM. This means that the abstraction has failed. Then, too, there are complications arising out of the abstraction. Abstractions of necessity hide the details of implementation, and, therefore, place limits on what can be accomplished. This is the reason why React has refs. The abstraction, itself, may have inherent complications.

The intent, rather, is to point out: There is no single development, in either technology or in management technique, that by itself promises even one order-of-magnitude improvement in [software] productivity, in reliability, in simplicity.

Recognizing that there is no magic method for building perfect software gets you out of the realm of magical thinking. It is only when you come out of this fantasy that you can deal with the reality of software. If there is no Silver Bullet, what can we do? We can accept that: There will always be complexity for us to manage. We will not write perfect software — and be OK with that.

Code Simplicity

There will always be compromise and imperfection. Good work takes time. We must deal with human factors preferences, politics, different ways of thinking. It also requires a willingness to accept objectives which are limited by physical, logical, and technological constraints, and to accept a compromise when conflicting objectives cannot be met.

Part of this is because simplicity is somewhat subjective. Part of this is because the interpretation of simplicity is dependent on experience. Something simple and obvious to a trained mathematician may be not be so simple for a biologist — and vice versa.

The system makes use of well-known cultural markers to ease comprehension. It maintains design consistency. It makes good use of semantics. It balances the needs of flexibility with the boundaries and domain of the system.

Complexity is circumscribed as much as possible.

Fler böcker av Max Kanat-Alexander

Unnecessary complexity is identified, and removed. Protecting Against Unnecessary Complexity While there are things individual developers can do to prevent complexity, it is efforts at the organizational level that have the most impact. Allow time for design. Allow time for good coding practices.

Allow time for refactoring. Every sacrifice has a cost. These costs add up over time. Author is creator of bugzilla project. Whenever I come across bold statements in the book, I would sit and think for 2 minutes to corelate with my programming experience.

Code Simplicity: The Fundamentals of Software

Most of the time I was able to come up with valid example. Th [Code Simplicity: This book is highly recommended for programmers who had spent significant time reading other programmers code.

If you are an experienced programmer you can consider the points in the books as to validate your current beliefs. I tend to agree on all of the points mentioned in the book and corelate with open source projects in postive and negative sense. Few of my favorites: Decisions should be made by individuals. Nov 29, Javi rated it liked it. Aug 14, Nikolay rated it it was amazing. Great explanation of why software and it's design must have a simple purpose.

The book is short, but complete. The language is clean and to the point. Most of the examples are practical enough, only a few too vague. And take few minutes to look through your experience and find better examples than those in the book. Feb 28, Mike Thompson rated it it was amazing Shelves: Many books, totaling thousands of pages, teach the mechanics of creating "good" code.

This is the first book I've read that speaks of the underlying principles behind all the others. That is it. A one word answer to the age old question of what makes great software. Max Kanat-Alexander distills years of experience into six laws of software. Like Asimov's Three Laws of Robotics http: At only 81 pages, lack of time is no excuse for not reading this book. Apr 04, Mohamed Sanaulla rated it it was ok Shelves: The books deals with Software development mostly with the design of the software.

Though the "science" part of it isn't really science, because it all boils down to the individual and how they interpret the so called laws. If you are beginner in software design, then this would be a good read as it doesnt deal with the topics in depth and hence its redundant information for an experienced developer. Another motivation for someone to read would be its small size, you can read it end-to-end in one The books deals with Software development mostly with the design of the software.

Another motivation for someone to read would be its small size, you can read it end-to-end in one sitting. View 1 comment. May 03, Lautaro rated it really liked it.

I think this is a great book for developers of any level. In times where we are overwhelmed by new technologies, patterns, tools and frameworks, this book steps back to the most important part of software development: Aug 07, Veselin Nikolov rated it it was amazing. A short list of rules, facts, and laws for software design.

They are so universal and logical that it's hard to disagree with anything written and examples what happens when people violate them are everywhere around us. Aug 31, Ayoub Mekkaoui rated it it was amazing. Why has there been no Science of Software Design? This book gives some answers and tries to make real fundamentals for software design. Worth reading. Aug 11, Kiril Kirilov rated it really liked it Shelves: Apr 10, Rob rated it liked it Shelves: Code Simplicity by Max Kanat-Alexander published by O'Reilly, is the kind of book you might give to a junior or journeyman programmer and say: Kanat-Alexander uses a conversational tone that takes this already common-sense study on the subject and makes it even more approachable and straightf Code Simplicity by Max Kanat-Alexander published by O'Reilly, is the kind of book you might give to a junior or journeyman programmer and say: Kanat-Alexander uses a conversational tone that takes this already common-sense study on the subject and makes it even more approachable and straightforward.

And just what is the subject here?

As the title dictates, the subject of the book is code simplicity: At a high level, Kanat-Alexander's discussions of the component parts of this subject are deft and lucid.

He is able to evoke familiar situations and scenarios e.

A lot of the techniques and suggestions will all seem like common sense to anyone who has been programming for a non-trivial interval: To those programmers, I say: Give it a whirl for the sake of the reminder, and if nothing else, at least be familiar with it so you'll know whether it is a good tract to hand out to your young and eager recruits. Again, the book has a conversational style and is filled with pithy aphorisms and witticisms that make it easy to absorb and retain Kanat-Alexander's message.

I found myself frequently transcribing passages into my notebook for later reference and for sharing with peers. Many stand out, but two in particular that I wanted to share.

Having good comments in code is a big part of making it readable. However, you generally should not add comments that say what a piece of code is doing. That should be obvious from reading the code.

I felt this was worth calling out because it was highly illustrative, and emblematic of the theme. Every programmer has had in-depth discussions about comments; and every programmer has committed code that should have been commented, and wasn't; and every programmer has committed code that was commented unnecessarily; etc. This is something that we've all done, and that we'll all do again. Thus, it is easy to identify with the message embedded in this lesson.

But what makes it particularly demonstrative of the book's theme is that Kanat-Alexander is trying to teach you first how to do without the comments. Consider first what you may add in value by taking away what is written and committed. He talks quite a bit about understanding, about taking the time to read and fully comprehend code before changing it; about taking the time to engage with the problem space and design a solution instead of simply stabbing at one. It can become a vicious cycle: Which reminds me of a joke we have going at the office: Anger leads to hate.

Hate leads to suffering.

Code Simplicity

Suffering leads to re-factoring. I've seen you do it, too. As for Code Simplicity itself: I do not actually have all that much in the way of critique. As I have said, it is a short text, pithy and aphorismic -- but this is indicative that it has accomplished its goal. So what would I have liked to see, or see more of?

First off, there is effectively no code presented at all; not that Kanat-Alexander promises us any -- just the opposite, he eschews code to drive home the philosophical points. Perhaps specific code examples would detract from that -- but there is a part of me that would liked to have seen something concrete in this area.

My other nit to pick was that the book's sub-heading is "The Science of Software Development", and though Kanat-Alexander presents things as "facts" and "laws", I didn't exactly see I read a lot of anecdotes, but I didn't see too many experiments of empirical methods. Given Kanat-Alexander's pedigree, and given the common-sense nature of so much of the advice contained in the book, I'll grant him a pass on this -- but I cannot in good conscience call it all scientific, even if I find myself vigorously agreeing with say So where do I land on this one?

I'd heartily recommend it to any junior or journeyman programmer that is looking for some insights into how to improve their craft and how to cultivate simplicity in their designs.

I know I'll likely be recommending it to folks that I mentor in the future -- again: Therefore, it behooves me to write as little code as possible. He doesn't come right out and use that phrase, nor does he come out and admit that Agile-style rapid iterations are the way to go either.

That isn't the subject of the book, and he is wise to stay away from "going there" -- but it's in there, at least a little bit. No one could help that. Mar 05, Matt rated it really liked it. Code Simplicity is a very short but concise look at the theory of what it takes to keep your code simple. This isn't a book about specific design structures although a few are discussed - it's about understanding what makes code easy to maintain.

The idea of taking a complex project and breaking it down into smaller challenges isn't new, but the author does a great job of pushing you to consider how code can quickly become a trainwreck.

Building without a plan, poorly explained functionality, e Code Simplicity is a very short but concise look at the theory of what it takes to keep your code simple. Building without a plan, poorly explained functionality, even ambiguous variables all lead to a knotted mess. Max drives home the point that you need to code simply in the sense that you should code understandably.

Even though other programmers will be the ones exposed to the code you've written, you need to be clear. Write code that addresses existing problems in a way that can be approached in the future , because you may very well be the one modifying the code years down the road. As short as this book is, you'd do yourself an injustice not to read it if you're looking for theory about writing cleaner, clearer code.

I'm definitely walking away with a new appreciation for making things easier on myself and other programmers.

Nov 20, Irvi rated it it was amazing Shelves: Programmers who don't fully understand their work tend to develop complex system. People seems to just accept that system will bloat over time, becoming unmaintainable and need to be rewritten.

However, none of this is inevitable.

Various code problems doesn't arise out of natural law, instead they arise from complexity. Indeed as a software grow, they will become larger.

Kundrecensioner

In fa Programmers who don't fully understand their work tend to develop complex system. In fact, effective software systems are inherently complex. However, we can maintain each of the component as simple as possible, so that we can comprehend as we look to that pieces.

Programming in essence must be an act of reducing complexity. If each of developer don't simplify their code each part will become hard to be understood thus the system can no longer be maintained. We must also consider the value for both of now and the future.

Looking at it, realistically, it actually involves the effort of implementation and maintenance. Future value and effort of maintenance itself is tightly coupled with time, where value will be measured by how much money the change will make us.We also incorporated a transform which was a translation component in the open source library Tensor2Tensor.

I would definitely recommend it for any developer that wants to spend more of his time bringing value for his customers and less value fixing problems. People seems to just accept that system will bloat over time, becoming unmaintainable and need to be rewritten. Many books, totaling thousands of pages, teach the mechanics of creating "good" code.

May 03, Lautaro rated it really liked it. And just what is the subject here?

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