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THE LEGEND OF SIGURD AND GUDRUN EBOOK

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The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún - Kindle edition by J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or. Editorial Reviews. Review. "Will appeal strongly to readers already haunted by the deeper, The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún by [Tolkien, J. R. R.]. Many years ago, J.R.R. Tolkien composed his own version of the great legend of Northern antiquity, recounted here in The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún.


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The world first publication of a previously unknown work by J.R.R. Tolkien, which tells the epic story of the Norse hero, Sigurd, the dragon-slayer, the reve. The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun is a Classic eBook by J R R Tolkien. Purchase this eBook product online from myavr.info | ID Mar 27, This Pin was discovered by VitalSource®. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest.

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The Lord of the Rings: The Hobbit. The Silmarillion. Unfinished Tales. A Translation and Commentary, together with Sellic Spell. The Fall of Arthur. Christopher Tolkien. The Story of Kullervo. The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun.

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Letters from Father Christmas. The History of the Hobbit: Mr Baggins and Return to Bag-End. John D. Tree and Leaf: The Monsters and the Critics. Smith of Wootton Major. The Adventures of Tom Bombadil. A Secret Vice: Tolkien on Invented Languages. Tales Before Narnia. Douglas A. A Middle English Reader and Vocabulary. Kenneth Sisam. How to write a great review. The review must be at least 50 characters long. The title should be at least 4 characters long.

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Continue shopping. Item s unavailable for purchase. Prefacing the work is one of J. Tolkien's original lectures on Norse literature, introducing the legends to students.

Fans will be aware that the Norse legends and sagas were among the greatest influences on Tolkien's writings. Twice Professor of Anglo-Saxon Old English at the University of Oxford, he also wrote a number of stories, including most famously "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings" , which are set in a pre-historic era in an invented version of the world which he called by the Middle English name of Middle-earth. Add to Wishlist. Discover how to get the best eBook reading experience on your phone, tablet, PC, Mac, or dedicated eReader.

You may not purchase this eBook if you're from one of the following countries:. Log In to sync your basket across devices. Home eBook Academic Classic General. Christopher Tolkien?

World first publication of this work; no part has ever been reproduced or quoted from since it was written more than 70 years ago? Tolkien was a scholar whose main interests were Old English and Old Norse literature. I mention this because I was checking out the other reviews for this and I got the feeling that some people might expect this to be fantasy in the sense in which the Peter Jackson movies Aside from being a legendary figure who pretty much defined high fantasy as we know it today, J.

I mention this because I was checking out the other reviews for this and I got the feeling that some people might expect this to be fantasy in the sense in which the Peter Jackson movies are fantasy. And, well, it's not. It's fantasy in the sense in which "Beowulf", the poem, is fantasy. They sound quite epic. Dread shapes arose from the dim spaces over sheer mountains by the Shoreless Sea, friends of darkness, foes immortal, old, unbegotten, out of ancient void.

To the world came war: The mountains were moved, mighty Ocean surged and thundered, the Sun trembled. The Gods gathered on golden thrones, of doom and death deeply pondered, how fate should be fended, their foes vanquished, their labour healed, light rekindled.

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Unfortunately, this occasionally makes for a difficult read. Tolkien's language can be quite old, words can be used in ways which were probably popular a few centuries ago, and don't quote me on this, but I think the poems assume some sort of familiarity with the story.

Which I don't have, since my education lacked things like the "Nibelungenlied", which is apparently similar. There are two poems in this book, the second basically being a sequel to the first. The legend of Sigurd begins with the making of the world: If Odin wants to win, he needs a hero who's his descendant, and who died once, to fight for him. Hence, Valhalla here, Vallholl is created as an afterlife where great heroes go after they die, spending time being merry and waiting until the end of days, when they'll go to battle again.

There's a plot with a ring going down from generation to generation and causing trouble, because of something Loki did of course , and a few great heroes descended from Odin rising one after the other and having impressive adventures. Then comes the "world's chosen", Sigurd, who slays a dragon, wins the heart of a Valkyrie, wins a kingdom and then proceeds to die tragically because he married the wrong woman and wooed the Valkyrie for a friend, thus making her quite angry it turns out "bait and switch" was a thing back then, too, but it was much more dangerous.

Odin may have caused this to happen, because he needed a hero. The second poem is about Sigurd's wife, who is quite angry about the fact that her husband was in love with another woman, and died, and the people who killed him are her own brothers, so she runs off to the woods. But her brothers and mother bring her back and make her into the wife of Attila the Hun, and that turns into a full-blown tragedy.

They sound amazing. They're awesome to read out loud. They're also difficult to understand especially if, like me, you kind of suck when it comes to names.

Luckily, while the poems themselves are around and 50 pages respectively, the rest of this page book has commentaries written by Christopher Tolkien, complete with what happened, what happened in the original Old Norse poems, what the weird words mean, and what's up with the poetic style.

They can be skipped, they can be read completely, or you can just do what I did and look up the things that seem interesting. I'm in awe of J. Tolkien's work here - it's not easy to write verse, especially when it has such strict rules as Old Norse poetry does. Never mind the fact that he was trying to single-handedly bring back into fashion that type of verse that's been dead for a thousand years, and making it sound good in modern English.

It makes my geeky heart tremble with joy, even more so than the tale of Bilbo Baggins. It's inspiring, and wonderful - and if I could have actually figured out the plot easily without endnotes, I'd have given this a full five stars. Tolkien's scholarship is always pretty impressive, even if it's out of date, now.

Reading the bits of his lectures pieced together by his son is very interesting, and I rather wish I could attend them. It's also amazing how much work he did on keeping the metre and language of Old Norse in a modern English version of the stories. The verse itself is probably the main attraction fo Tolkien's scholarship is always pretty impressive, even if it's out of date, now. The verse itself is probably the main attraction for readers.

The story can be difficult to follow, but I think once you get into the swing of it -- or if you know the basic ideas already -- it's no harder to follow than a translation of The Saga of the Volsungs, though it is obviously in verse whereas that is mostly prose.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Yes, five stars. Yup, I think so. Let me explain. Anyone that knows about Norse legend knows that the sources present pretty much the opposite of a cohesive narrative. Someone with a real working knowledge of these texts and their language actually worked out a unified narrative. Would it be worth 5 stars then? No, not for me anyway. First, since it is a poem, there is the technicalities of the poetry itself.

Again, one who writes modern English poetry but seeks to capture the feel and metre of Old Norse verse must be immensely learned and also artistically gifted. Tolkien stays true to the Old Norse here and gives us proper structure, metre, and alliteration. What about the story itself, its narrative force, and its ability to make you feel the emotions of the cast while also immersing you into the culture of the times?

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The story itself is vast and intimate at the same time. This is not my first foray into Norse Myth and Legend. Previously I had focused mostly on the figure of Sigurd. He kills the dragon Fafnir, obtains a magical ring, and wields an ancient and reforged sword. Pretty LOTR of him and pretty cool. His murder of Regin is genuinely conflicting: They are both the heroine; neither is a real villain. The real villain is fate—and also Grimhild. Take these two stanzas: My sons I slew seared with madness: There sits beside me son nor daughter; the world is empty, the waves are cold.

They slew Sigurd: Sigurd, Sigurd, on swift Grani lay saddle and bridle and seek for me! So, yes, in summary, it is worth 5 stars. View all 4 comments. Jun 06, Siren rated it it was amazing Shelves: One of my favourite tales of all time is that of the heroic lays in the Poetic Edda. Its a story that spans centuries and have a different folktale version all over europe, though the most famous is that of the Poetic Edda, and the German Nibelungenlied.

I was psyched when I saw that Tolkien had worked on a translation of this, and even more so when I realised that there were notes and -imagine this- his own t One of my favourite tales of all time is that of the heroic lays in the Poetic Edda.

I was psyched when I saw that Tolkien had worked on a translation of this, and even more so when I realised that there were notes and -imagine this- his own tries at eddic poetry. The text is sectioned into scholarly notes on the heroic lays as they are in the Poetic Edda and the Saga of the Volsungs, what Tolkien chose to use in his rendition as well as Christopher Tolkien's own thoughts and work.

If you, like me, is a total nerd for old norse literature and Tolkien's scholarly work then this is a must read. What a treat it is to find yet more from the pen of Tolkien. That there has continued to be a frequent publication of new works throughout the decades following his death is a testament to the Professor's vast literary output and imagination; that he wrote lengthy works such as this one, which could simply never have been published if not for the sucess of "The Lord of the Rings," is of course a testament to Tolkien as a poet and a storyteller.

Something like this is only written because the aut What a treat it is to find yet more from the pen of Tolkien. Something like this is only written because the author is moved to write it, with little or no hope of an audience. Naturally the literary merits or lack thereof of this as a single work of poetry is a separate matter. Tolkien was quite deliberately aiming to imitate the style of the Old Norse heroic poetry, resulting in something quite different than perhaps most readers expect from Tolkien.

In one of his lectures, Tolkien spoke of the difference this is quoted on p. If it is not often slow and elegiac, it is powerful and striking.

The poetry is often very moving, and filled with many good, memorable things: I look forward to future re-readings. Any feeling of disappointment over brevity may be compounded by the deceiving thickness of the poems' pages: Perhaps this latter option should have been adopted by Christopher Tolkien, despite his father's wishes -- I also incline to the feeling that it makes the verses easier for beginners to this meter to scan.

The extra material is most welcome.

The Legend of Sigurd & Gudrún

It is enjoyable for those familiar with the Norse originals to see how Tolkien handles long-standing scholarly debates or discrepancies in the various versions of the story for example it was interesting that he chose to follow the version of the ring-transmission as given by Snorri, which I always took to be the unnecessarily complicated one as it involves TWO rings instead of one. The sudden appearance of the opening lines of the Old English "Battle at Finnsburh" in Gunnar's mouth, during the last assault, was a treat; so too was a development with the Goths under Atli's rule which is entirely original to Tolkien.

For those not already familiar with the stories, the brevity mentioned previously will naturally make for some confusion, though Christopher Tolkien's notes fill in these gaps nicely. It may be wondered how many readers want to take the time to consult "the Notes" at the rear; but it is well worth it to take the time to dive deeper into these stories which so moved and inspired Tolkien and many others, and which still do so now.

I went in with a bit of trepidation, remembering my high school and college attempts to read Beowulf, Shakespeare plays, and other literature written in ancient styles. It felt like digging for treasure; sure it was more work than, say, reading a manga, but the payoff was worth every minute of my time.

The first thing I came to appreciate about this book was the position the editor took as a guide for the reader. He established himself as an expert or at least knowledgeable enough in the subjects that the book covered but never came across as pompous or arrogant. This was my first experience with Nordic style poetry even though written in English and I found it exciting and fast-paced.

More than anything, I felt it was a cousin to Japanese short-style poetry the best known being, of course, haiku. The poems got straight to the point and never lagged or wasted space on trivial details.

It was action after action, non-stop plot movement. Finally, the appendices at the end were a welcome addition. The book would have been just as entertaining, educating, and satisfying without them but they also felt completely at home here.

It was a good way to end the tome, even though I felt I could have consumed more if it had been provided. Yes this is an epic poem inspired by Norse mythology. This will not be everybody's cup of tea. I enjoyed the poem itself but then when it comes to poetry my opinion tends to be either 'yeah I like this' and 'no I don't like this' you won't really find me gushing over poetry and the additional commentary most of it by Christopher Tolkien but much of it is based on notes his father left and there is also a transcript of a whole lecture JRR Tolkien once gave on the Edda was interesting - at lea Yes this is an epic poem inspired by Norse mythology.

I enjoyed the poem itself but then when it comes to poetry my opinion tends to be either 'yeah I like this' and 'no I don't like this' you won't really find me gushing over poetry and the additional commentary most of it by Christopher Tolkien but much of it is based on notes his father left and there is also a transcript of a whole lecture JRR Tolkien once gave on the Edda was interesting - at least large parts of it were interesting.

So I admit to skipping a couple of paragraphs here and there. If you're just interested in Tolkien's Middle Earth you can skip the book. There are really only a handful of direct references to Middle Earth and those are just references to names of characters and places and while Norse mythology did inspire Middle Earth you'll have an easier read with a prose-retelling of it. However if you do enjoy Norse mythology in general and aren't turned of by poetry and lots of very archaic language this book might interest you.

May 04, X rated it it was amazing. So, I may have given this four stars, but it's Tolkien and I'm biased. It's a glorious, dramatic poem based on the Norse legend, and while I prefer prose to poetry, I found it fairly easy to read all things considered.

I did have a bit of trouble following all the details, but that never bothered me very much. Christopher Tolkien's notes are very informative, though sometimes beyond my knowledge of poetic structure, linguistics and ancient history. They do give a better overall understanding of t So, I may have given this four stars, but it's Tolkien and I'm biased. They do give a better overall understanding of the legend and its historical context, and they also helped clarify the parts where I wasn't sure what had happened.

On another note, it is interesting to compare this to LOTR and the Silmarillian, as there are certain similarities. Oct 02, ambyr rated it liked it Shelves: I am not qualified to rate this book. The poetry has a lovely rhythm--I'm glad I read it in audio--but it is, as Christopher Tolkein admits, full of lacunae; it's really written for people who already have a deep understanding of the Eddas, and I am not that person.

And while Christopher Tolkein provides detailed editorial notes, he delves so deep into the weeds of how the stories evolved that I am still left with an unclear picture of what the story is. Also, he has an irritating tendency to d I am not qualified to rate this book. Also, he has an irritating tendency to define words that don't need defining.

I know what glamoured and meted and boon mean, thanks. Although toft was a new one for me. But still, I'm not sorry I read it for the sake of passages like this. Even if I don't really understand the context, it's a hell of a death scene: Teeth were poisoned, tongues were darting; in lidless eyes light was shining. A harp she sent him; his hands seized it, strong he smote it; strings were ringing.

Wondering heard men words of triumph songs up-soaring from serpents' pit. There coldly creeping coiling serpents as stones were staring stilled, enchanted. There slowly swayed they, slumber whelmed them, as Gunnar sang of Gunnar's pride.

The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun

As voice in Valholl valiant ringing the golden Gods he glorious named; of Odin sang he, Odin's chosen, of Earth's most mighty, of ancient kings. A huge adder hideous gleaming from stony hiding was stealing slow. Huns still heard him his harp thrilling, and doom of Hunland dreadly chanting. An ancient adder evil-swollen, to breast it bent and bitter stung him. Loud cried Gunnar life forsaking; harp fell silent, and heart was still.

Apr 26, Ben rated it it was amazing. Any time a new book appears with J. Tolkien's name on it, it's bound to stir up interest and this should be no exception. Unlike much of his writing, however, this particular book is not directly related to Middle Earth and its hobbits, wizards, and elves.

It's born of earlier interests of Tolkien's that predate The Hobbit, namely Old Norse mythology, literature, and language. The fascinating thing that most people don't know, is that language was Tolkien's foremost passion during his life a Any time a new book appears with J.

The fascinating thing that most people don't know, is that language was Tolkien's foremost passion during his life and his earliest success. Philology was the source of inspiration for all his writing of Middle Earth.

In fact he was a renowned scholar in the field. So it's no surprise he translated and interpreted a number of medieval works such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Beowulf. Two equally important works had been misplaced and forgotten until just recently, and those are published for the first time in this book, the one titled "The New Lay of the Volsungs" and the other "The New Lay of Gudrun". If these names at all sound familiar, they should, as they derive from some of the most well-known Germanic poems of old.

The Volsunga Saga and Nibelungenlied have captured the imagination of scholars and readers for centuries, perhaps reaching a cultural pinnacle in the Ring of Nibelung cycle of operas by Richard Wagner.

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They tell the story of a great warrior, Sigurd Siegfried , and his triumphs, loves, and losses.The last time I read poetry that glorified battle in such a way was when I read Beowulf last year.

This has caused Tolkien to be popularly identified as the "father" of modern fantasy literature—or more precisely, high fantasy. Many years ago, J. It is hard to imagine Tolkien making a mistake like having Padme die but Leia remembering her real mother, or having such a weakly thought out group as the Jedi.

I was on the mission to collect all of Tolkien's works and try to read as many as possible in March. It means that someone who is coming to the saga first hand is getting knowledge of the notes late. He has translated ancient poetry into English, making it feel modern and slick; yet, he captures all the history and lore that come with such historical tales.

On another note, it is interesting to compare this to LOTR and the Silmarillian, as there are certain similarities.

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