myavr.info Biography Bad Science Ben Goldacre Ebook

BAD SCIENCE BEN GOLDACRE EBOOK

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Bad Science by Ben Goldacre. Read online, or download in secure EPUB format. Read "Bad Science" by Ben Goldacre available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first purchase. Ben Goldacre's wise and witty bestseller, . Editorial Reviews. From Booklist. British doctor Goldacre is funny and blunt as he bashes Advanced Search. Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Science & Math.


Bad Science Ben Goldacre Ebook

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Full of spleen, this will be a hilarious, invigorating and informative journey through the world of Bad Science. When Dr Ben Goldacre saw someone on daytime. The informative and witty expose of the "bad science" we are all subjected to, Bad Science. Quacks, Hacks, and Big Pharma Flacks. by Ben Goldacre. ebook. Have you ever wondered how one day the media can assert that alcohol is bad for us and the next unashamedly run a story touting the benefits of daily alcohol.

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Broken Homes. How to write a great review. The review must be at least 50 characters long. The title should be at least 4 characters long. Your display name should be at least 2 characters long. At Kobo, we try to ensure that published reviews do not contain rude or profane language, spoilers, or any of our reviewer's personal information.

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He goes over what flaws to look out for in the studies themselves, as well as the common ways journalists completely screw up reporting about subjects they don't always understand. In particular, he focuses a lot on homeopathy and the MMR autism link which doesn't actually exist , both of which he destroys.

The takeaways f Audiobook. The takeaways from this book are how to identify shoddy reporting, what questions to ask about research to know if it is shoddy research, and a deep distrust of anything you're ever told. This was by no means a new concept, but the depth of it is staggering. That four sugar pills are better than two sugar pills for treating pain is insane. That red pills are better than yellow pills for treating pain is nuts.

Ben Goldacre

There is more, but I am wary of misquoting it, so I'll stop. Just note that the placebo effect defies every bit of good sense you have. My primary complaint about the book is the tone.

It is amazing when he is preaching to the choir as he is with me, but he calls a spade a spade. He has no problem calling Big Parma evil, nor some researchers frauds by name , nor calling some journalists incompetent. If you currently believe in homeopathy, you might find yourself insulted too much to listen.

Ben Goldacre

He doesn't mean to. But I can see how one could take his attack on homeopathy and various other things as attacks on themselves. They are not though, so do attempt to look past his flippant and challenging tone to what he is presenting. Sep 26, Kathryn rated it liked it Shelves: A humorous look at the non sense surrounding complementary and alternative medicine. A pithy, amusing read. This excellent book written by the intelligent and entertaining doctor and health communicator Ben Goldacre is a must read for anyone who has an opinion about any health issue you've seen, heard or read about in the media.

Although written in the context of the UK, its lessons and advice apply to anyone anywhere.

But these are not just his proclamations on the issues: While some of it is about correcting the egregious falsehoods proclaimed by journalists and snake oil peddlers, it is mostly about arming the reader with the tools to determine for yourself whether a topic or a position is as described or worth further investigation. Critical thinking, logic and skepticism Everyone should read this book. Kindle note: I bought the Amazon Kindle version of this book. While it has all the expected footnotes and endnotes linked nicely, the text makes frequent references to graphs, tables, diagrams and images that do not appear in the Kindle version.

This is not a shortcoming of the Kindle or ebook format I've converted a number of ebooks I already own into Kindle format, complete with images, graphs, etc -- this is simply laziness on the part of the publisher. You might want to consider this before buying any Kindle ebook that may contain non-text items. This ebook has been updated since my initial review in and the previously mentioned Kindle formatting shortcomings have been resolved.

Oct 25, Nancy rated it it was amazing Recommended to Nancy by: Petra X. I've read about most of the topics covered in this book elsewhere, but Goldacre does a great job of teaching us to spot the failures of Big Pharma, alternative medicine and journalism. He does this in an entertaining way using ripped-from-the-headlines stories. Last week I was in the mood to read some non-fiction so went to the shelves of one of my goodreads friends and made a list of her 5 star health and science books.

Armed with that,I found several of those books at the library and have been I've read about most of the topics covered in this book elsewhere, but Goldacre does a great job of teaching us to spot the failures of Big Pharma, alternative medicine and journalism.

Armed with that,I found several of those books at the library and have been happily reading ever since. Goodreads is a wonderful way to discover good books published years ago. Unlike a just published book that you have to wait months for at the library, good books published 2 or 10 or 76 years don't have a waiting list see Rats Lice and History: Nov 03, seryal olcay rated it it was amazing Shelves: It took me long to finish it but OMG what a wonderful book for those who are interested in real scientific evidence based facts to charlatans who believes in their imagination or stupid nutritionists, homeopathists.

I had a lot inspriration from the book and enjoyed the reading very much. I'd like to quote; 'The true cost of sth , as the Economist says, 'is what you give up to get it. So much loss of money, health resources on to get rid of superstitious accusations, belief , bullshitters.

The anti It took me long to finish it but OMG what a wonderful book for those who are interested in real scientific evidence based facts to charlatans who believes in their imagination or stupid nutritionists, homeopathists. The anticampaginers to vaccination programme was the most striking one for me and the omega pills , how misused they were was also incredible.

Mar 31, Ken Robert rated it it was amazing. No one is spared in this delightfully infuriating tour of the myriad ways we can be duped by bad advice on health and medicine. The author, Dr. Ben Goldacre, skewers alternative medicine quack jobs, data dithering drug researchers, scare mongering journalists, pinheaded politicians, and simple minded celebrities who would all gleefully sell us horse manure if we were willing to buy it.

And he does it with a flair for making the confusing understandable as well as entertaining. Read this book and yo No one is spared in this delightfully infuriating tour of the myriad ways we can be duped by bad advice on health and medicine.

Read this book and you'll walk away with a better defense against poor reasoning, terrible math, and your own mind's tendency to play tricks on you, or, in other words, bad science. Feb 29, Dekks rated it liked it. Excellent book that I think everyone should read, I don't consider myself to be a particular naive person, and I'm not a conspiracy nut whatsoever, but at the same time am under no illusions about Big Pharma.

That said, it was a real eye opener to see just how biased and flawed some of the medical studies were and that very reputable medical journals regularly publish findings and studies that should be very suspect to the professional scientist.

The only problem with this book, and why I only ga Excellent book that I think everyone should read, I don't consider myself to be a particular naive person, and I'm not a conspiracy nut whatsoever, but at the same time am under no illusions about Big Pharma.

I also think he spent a little too much time going into the charlatan fields like Homeopathy etc, one chapter on pseudo science would of been enough to get his message across without rehashing the same argument over and over, which got a little laborious, even if I do agree with him. Some editing could turn this from a good book into a excellent one, and one final point is that while the book is humourous in places, it isn't really that funny, which isn't really a valid criticism as I don't think it particularly is trying to be, but a lot of reviews and product pages list it as a laugh out loud expose of what's wrong with science reporting which might mislead some readers.

May 09, Jafar rated it really liked it. This is the kind of the book that I would make everyone read when I get to rule the world. Examples are endless. Detox treatment? Just a big hoax. Even a bigger hoax. All those fancy and expensive cosmetic products that supposedly do magic to your skin?

Just a waste of money. Vitamin C prevents and treats cold? Not really. Antioxidants slow This is the kind of the book that I would make everyone read when I get to rule the world. Antioxidants slow down aging? No — more of it may actually be even bad for you. You think fish-oil pills make your children smarter? How about all those vitamin and mineral pills and food supplement products?

Useless and waste of money if your diet is half decent. Does everything really either cause cancer or cure it? As impossible as it may seem to believe given what the media tell us every day, the answer is no. Goldacre does more than debunk these popular myths. He digs deeper into why bad science gets disseminated and why the public believes it.

A lot of it has to do with simple commercial self-interest. Take the case of "nutritionists," for example. Their biggest achievement is brainwashing the entire population into believing that what they say is based on scientific research. They may occasionally say something sensible, like: To push the pills and the products on people, they resort to science-y-sounding misinformation. Despite what most think, calling yourself a nutritionist does not require any scientific qualifications.

Some of them may have science degrees, but these people are not scientists and what they say is not backed by real scientific research. So they get it all wrong when they supposedly transfer knowledge from the experts to the laymen. There many other social, cultural, and psychological factors discussed in the book that are contributing to the prevalent presentation of mumbo-jumbo as science. Bad science can cost many, many lives. Feb 04, Deirdre rated it really liked it Shelves: An extension of his blog, this is a collection of basically rants about how science and statistics are abused by a variety of people.

It also looks at faulty science behind some nutritionists and some of their dodgy "credentials".

His emphasis is on making people question "facts" and double check the evidence. However, people don't have the time for a lot of this, and when you're offered a glimmer of hope people tend to take it. The placebo effect is explored here and he does admit that it works An extension of his blog, this is a collection of basically rants about how science and statistics are abused by a variety of people.

The placebo effect is explored here and he does admit that it works and works well if people load it with belief, so maybe examining everything doesn't always work as well as it might. It's a book worth reading, if only to read why he is so virulently opposed to some people's "science", I must admit to having read some of the books involved and having some reservations but it wasn't until I actually read this that I truly realised what was bothering me about them.

This is part of the problem, I do have a background in Science but I really didn't have enough energy or time to really exhaustively research some of the "facts" given to me by some of these writers. The fact that there are people like Ben Goldacre out there help me sort the truth from the fiction. I am so incredibly disappointed by this book. I expected a comical look at some of the more popular science misconceptions sweeping the world okay, the UK and US. Instead, I struggled paragraph by paragraph to not just light the book on fire.

In terms of content: But the tone of the book He is I am so incredibly disappointed by this book. He is arrogant and rude and at every turn is insulting both the readers and the authority figures who are "deceiving" the public. I really wish I could recommend this book because the content is important and even interesting. But I just can't support a book that alternates between calling the readers idiots and just plain laughing in your face.

That is a sure way to alienate everyone who is looking for answers in a world of misrepresented science. Nov 03, Anna J. Looking for a book that shines a light on the ways media infuences public opinion in matters of homoepathy, fish oil, antioxidants and the likes?

Here it is. Topped with some suggestions how to approach scientific studies, papers and flawed reviews of those. Minus two starts for the condescending tone and the overload on examples. A readable romp through the misuse and abuse of health related science in the media.

The analysis of homeopathy, mrs McKeith and the brain gym seemed like shooting fish in a barrel, but then I remember that people make a lot of money marketing that kind of nonsense. March Bad Science 11 51 Mar 11, Readers also enjoyed. About Ben Goldacre. Ben Goldacre. Ben Goldacre is a British science writer and psychiatrist, born in He is the author of The Guardian newspaper's weekly Bad Science column and a book of the same title, published by Fourth Estate in September Goldacre is the son of Michael Goldacre, professor of public health at the University of Oxford, the nephew of science journalist Robyn Williams, and the great-great-grandson of Sir Ben Goldacre is a British science writer and psychiatrist, born in Goldacre is the son of Michael Goldacre, professor of public health at the University of Oxford, the nephew of science journalist Robyn Williams, and the great-great-grandson of Sir Henry Parkes.

Books by Ben Goldacre. Trivia About Bad Science. No trivia or quizzes yet. Quotes from Bad Science. Your body plays tricks on your mind.

You cannot be trusted. Welcome back. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Looking for a Science Fiction Book. How to buy official Science March Shirt The Book Vipers: Like some of the less-favorable reviews point out, the book is a bit repetitive and shrill at times Goldacre seems to have a particular ax to grind with yuppies with humanities backgrounds , and very Brit-centric, so some might say five stars is a stretch.

If the subject matter were less important I'd probably agree, but taken as a whole package the combination of importance and readability makes it a standout. Strongly recommended. Overall a very good and amusing book. I think the author does get a little passionate about some topics and rambles a bit, but it's an ok tradeoff. I do wish the author gave more defining criteria for some of the items he discusses, especially about homeopathy.

I would like to know more about what kind of products he has referring to in some of his discussions. I thought I was having a stroke! Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. I just finished reading Bad Science by Ben Goldacre, and it's the most important book I've read in a long time.

It's not a thriller, it's a nonfiction work of popular science. But that description doesn't do this book justice. Bad Science has the power to change the world for the better , if people would read it carefully and with an open mind.

It rails against the anti-science winds sweeping our culture, and more importantly, empowers ordinary people of reasonable intelligence to think like scientists and protect themselves from so much unscientific claptrap dressed up as science that is for sale, is on the Internet, and even in respectable media such as newspapers.

In fact, I believe Bad Science should be a mandatory part of all high school science curricula, or at the very least, required reading for all medical students who in my experience are as vulnerable to pseudoscience as other people. Heck, whoever you are, if you haven't read this book, you need to. Ben Goldacre is a brainy muckraker who, with acerbic wit and unassailable accuracy, attacks anti-scientific BS and clearly explains how it cloaks itself in a scientific aura, and how it's wrong.

The beautiful thing is, you don't have to be a scientist or even a particularly scientifically literate person to understand. Anybody with a brain can detect BS if given the proper tools. Goldacre's targets cover the spectrum from "quacks, hacks" to "big pharma flacks". He lays bare the alternative realities in which live detox treatments, ear candling, anti-aging cosmetics, homeopathy, diet experts, antioxidants, pharmaceutical companies with large advertising budgets, vaccine opponents, and most frightening of all, people who oppose antiretroviral therapy for AIDS and argue that HIV does not cause this disease.

In my opinion, the author is utterly fair in his arguments. But he is not always nice. Is there a reason why he should be? Ben Goldacre is my new hero, slaying dragons of ignorance and going head-to-head in intellectual combat with some of the most hysterically irrational elements in society today. Along the way as you read this entertaining book, you'll learn what you need to know about clinical trials, about the power and limitations of statistics, and about how to think critically, to become a little Ben Goldacre yourself.

My favorite quote from the book is one of the best science quotes of all time: The plural of "anecdote" is not "data". The term 'science' is used to confer status to a lot of things that are just opinions or are just advertising gimmicks. This book was written by a professional who can help you distinguish real science from cheap nonsense that is only designed to fool you. Real science is really valuable and is validated according to strict methodology.

Junk science violates proper methodology in order to get you to do foolish things. Robert Aster author: Missions from JPL fifty years of amazing flight projects. One person found this helpful. Interesting book. Author writes well with a cynical sense of humor.

He has a chapter where he pounds some nutritionist who I never heard of but is apparently a big deal in the author's native England. It seems like a personal vendetta of some sort. Anyhow, there's enough good stuff in here that makes it worthwhile.

The book makes you look at "evidence" and "studies" in a whole new way, and how you can filter out promotional crap from reality. This is the most informative and authoritative book on Complimentary Medecine I have encountered. It is broadly redesrched, has good illustrations, is witty as well as relatively non-Judgemental. A winner for Skeptics and those seeking knowledge of the lack of Science-Based claims of Complementary Medicine.

Great insight into the issues that there are Great insight into the issues that there are with many studies and research done today for the sake of views, hits, and sensationalism. See all reviews.The review must be at least 50 characters long. Professor Brian Cox. Ben Goldacre has made a point of exposing quack doctors and nutritionists, bogus credentialing programs, and biased scientific studies. Your display name should be at least 2 characters long. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews.

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