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A SEARCH IN SECRET INDIA PDF

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$ A SEARCH IN SECRET INDIA. This is the famous classic that has sold more than a quarter million copies. It is the story of this celebrated writer's spiritual. A Search in Secret India is the story of Paul Brunton's journey around India, living among yogis, mystics, Download A Search in Secret India here (PDF mb). Author: Brunton Paul Title: A search in secret India Year: Link download: myavr.info This is the.


A Search In Secret India Pdf

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DOWNLOAD PDF Nine Lives: In Search of the Sacred in Modern India · Read more Pearl's Secret: A Black Man's Search for His White Family. Read more. PAUL BRUNTON A SEARCH IN SECRET INDIA $ A SEARCH IN SECRET INDIA This is the famous classic that has sold more than a quarter million. Cashback (2): Get 10% cashback using RuPay cards. Max Cashback - INR if you are using RuPay card for first time on Amazon. INR 25 if you have used.

It happened during the night in a state between sleeping and waking, and led to deepening of the stillness: there was no need to meditate.

The verse in the Bhagavad Gita which mentions that to the Knower the day is as night and the night is as day became literally true, and remains so. It came of itself and I realized the Divine had always been with me and in me. He died on July 27, in Vivey, Switzerland - his son listened to a death rattle thrice, then a sigh of release. Brunton wasn't born Paul Brunton. In a London suburb in he was born as Raphael Hurst.

Trained in the metaphysical art of positive thinking and timing, he chose a new name for himself when he wrote A Search in Secret India. It was his first book, a time of new career navigation. His choice was Brunton Paul, a concoction he thought elegant.

But his typesetter thought it was backwards and in a gesture of undisclosed helpfulness reversed it to Paul Brunton. Ten thousand copies rolled off the presses and Raphael Hurst chuckled at the karmic inversion - and happily accepted it. To his friends and students he became PB, a trimmed down appellation that reflected his trim mustache and innate modesty.

To judge Brunton solely by his book A Secret would be misleading. In real life he was a far more spiritual man than Brunton the mystically curious journalist and occasionally annoyingly skeptic of A Search.

True, he was both seeker and scientific literate. But his narration in A Search seems an exaggerated guise to create credibility in book of yogic transhuman testimony that also meets scientific prove-it, how-does-this-work scrutiny.

He shrewdly noted the Hindu's tendency to accept any claim as true.

A Search In Secret India

Years later Brunton humorously remarked that as his books ascended into higher strata of philosophy his audience shrunk proportionately. His mother and younger brother died when he was a little boy. By age sixteen Brunton had reached his full height - a short man, which he was slightly self conscious of, but with a high forehead. He habitually noted mystically advanced people's precipitous forehead. And by age sixteen he was seriously meditating - indeed he was almost a doppelganger to the youthful Ramana Maharshi, 18 years his senior, who underwent a transformative samadhi at age Brunton records in his private journal, "Before I reached the threshold of manhood and after six months of unwavering daily practice of meditation and eighteen months of burning aspiration for the Spiritual Self, I underwent a series of mystical ecstasies.

During them I attained a kind of elementary consciousness of it It was certainly the most blissful time I had ever had until then. I saw how transient and how shallow was earthly pleasure by comparison with the real happiness to be found in this deeper Self.

By his own intentions he may not have lived into future years. He resolved in his teenage diary, "Commit suicide a fortnight hence. Apparently, moving to more congenial environs wasn't a realistic option. In what would be a good Dickens plot, plans were set. And questions bubbled up. What would happen to him at death's door? Curiosity carried him to the British Museum Library where the reference librarian steered him to the shelves in spiritualism subjects.

A stack of books on the astral worlds hefted in his hands, he went home and read. And read. More books checked out. Two weeks sped by and he noted the suicide better be postponed. With newfound knowledge of the realities of reincarnation and astral existence, the idea of suicide died. Brunton formed a Bohemian parlor society of spiritual seekers, attended London Theosophical Society meetings and joined the Spiritualist Society of Great Britain.

He found as a tributary of his meditations that occult powers were eddying into his consciousness. When Brunton learned that a well-known public speaker was practicing black magic, he attended the next lecture.

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When the address began, Brunton psychically cut the light power. When the power was switched on again, he projected such a force it blew the light bulbs into shards. Fascinated, he plunged headlong into these waters, but an inner message flung him to shore: either continue the sidetrack of psychism or the central path of spiritual realization. He agonized, but chose the more important path to Self. The powers subsided, though he kept an intuitive sensitivity aglow.

His son Kenneth recounts how he brought his fianc[? Brunton sat in withdrawn, stony silence the whole time, leaving the son exasperated. Brunton later explained it was necessary to become absorbed in his Higher Self - requiring a meditative stillness - to feel out the prospects for the union. Paul Brunton as his personal spiritual adviser.

This book is a warts and all expose of Paul Brunton and I recommend it as a warning that all of us, including Gurus, Godmen and Maharishes are human and have human faults. Take knowledge from wherever you may find it but don't make the mistake of worshipping another person. View all 6 comments. Jan 18, Sampath rated it it was amazing. A must read and must own book. I know I will read this book again. The author has shared his invaluable and spellbounding dialogues with Maharishis and Yogi's.

Its a great service to a man kind that the author has shared his experience. Aug 10, Sumangali Morhall rated it it was amazing Shelves: For anyone seeking a spiritual teacher, or even anyone having found the right one, this story is incredibly moving. Brunton's erudite use of language, coupled with his ruthless inner and outer search, makes this a gripping read from start to finish.

His descriptions of the journey alone would make a beautiful travel journal. But his descriptions of inner expe For anyone seeking a spiritual teacher, or even anyone having found the right one, this story is incredibly moving. But his descriptions of inner experiences are breath-taking, especially those in the company of the great Ramana Maharshi. May 03, Krystn rated it really liked it.

Here is a very readable tour of India during the early s. Paul Brunton Ph.

Being a British intellectual with a scientific and philosophical education, he approached Yogis with skepticism and an open mind quite unusual for the scientific minded.

He describes in detail the Yogis dedicated to spiritual growth and gives brief reviews of those focused on magic and egotism. He spends the last quarter Here is a very readable tour of India during the early s. He spends the last quarter of the book describing his time with Ramana Maharishee at his small ashram in Tamil India. He was changed forever by the months spent with the Maharishee. During the period of his travel, Gandhi was gaining a huge following but Brunton avoided asides on the political movements except when revolutionary fervor produced violence in his vicinity.

Altogether, this is a well written and honest account of travel in India. Mar 06, Mary-lou rated it it was amazing Shelves: This book had been recommended to me about thirty years ago by the father of a close friend, Mr Goss, and I had never sought it out until now. I am glad I didn't read this book until I was 'ready' for it. It is,in short, a classic on the search for spiritual meaning.

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It is set in India but this search is ultimately a search for Self which can occur in very many situations. At times Bruntons lack of understanding of the ways of another culture made me cringe especially when it is things that I th This book had been recommended to me about thirty years ago by the father of a close friend, Mr Goss, and I had never sought it out until now.

At times Bruntons lack of understanding of the ways of another culture made me cringe especially when it is things that I think even in were unforgivable.

It is also a good insight into just how much control, respect and power the English had in India at that time. He was very much writing from the perspective of a far superior being in his eyes any way BUT that doesn't change the fact that he got it in the end.

It was a marvellous journey! View 2 comments. Sep 29, Joli rated it it was amazing. I loved that this author explored India the way I might.

He went quite slowly, as far as explaining the spirituality of gurus.

I wish there had been a medium step to bridge the gap. Brunton has many books and I have just requested about 5 of them. I'll write about them as I read them. Oct 18, Suba rated it really liked it Recommends it for: I like the writer's style of writing.

It is more like a diary and the writer's experience is recorded vividly through his own words. Paul Brunton wrote about his journey to india to explore the secrets of the spiritual world. My prior knowledge in Hinduism and my own experience in India helped me to digest his words easily. Its worth reading if you are interested in yoga, spiritual and mystic. View 1 comment. Jan 05, David rated it it was amazing. Tells about British authors strange experiences exploring India.

Really makes you think May 08, Justin rated it really liked it Shelves: An enjoyable travelogue. May 07, Bernie Gourley rated it really liked it Shelves: In the process, he found a number of masters of body, mind, and both.

However, he finds these individuals as rare nuggets in a sea of frauds. Brunton states up front that he won't waste time with any of the blatant frauds or suspected frauds, but he does devote space to a number of the more impressive ones. Impressive either by way of a large following or artfulness of technique. He also finds individuals he doesn't know what to make of.

These individuals appear to have impressive otherworldly skills, but skills that he can neither reconcile with known scientific understanding nor uncover as hoaxes despite his best skeptical inquiry. Given Occam's Razor, he seems to be left suspecting that these are masters of illusion, but he maintains skepticism of his skepticism.

A prime example of this is a Yogi who seems to be able to conjure any scent upon request. Brunton also runs across individuals who are able to do amazing things that are inconsistent with his knowledge of the world, but which his exhaustive investigations leave little room to dispute.

For example, there is one yogi who can completely cease his respiration for a seemingly impossible length of time, and who resumed breathing not with a gasp but with a slow, calm series of breaths. As suggested above, this book is really an attempt to analyze India's spirituality through the lens of Western logical and scientific approaches. The author is a Brit and the book was first published in the 's.

His worldview is consistent with that status. While Brunton would like to master his own mind, he is unwilling to let himself be duped.

There is another side to this juxtaposition of East and West. The yogis and gurus with which Brunton comes into contact often have trouble grasping the Western mindset there is one notable exception. What these wise-men have difficulty understanding is why a people, like the British, devote so much time to mastering the external world and with a great measure of success it must be added , but put so little effort into mastering or understanding the self.

Most of the gurus appreciate that a Brit is taking an interest in the spiritual and yogic ways of India, but with their own skepticism. They find Westerners materially rich, but bankrupt of the mind. They find the Brits strong, but lacking the supple power that yoga introduces. After completing his travels, it seems the book is set to draw to an end.

However, Brunton realizes that while there were a number of skilled individuals that he came across in his travels,there is one that stands out as someone he should not miss an opportunity to learn more from. Therefore, instead of getting on a steamer back to England, he returns to South India to a man called the Maharishee in order to find out if the guru will take him as a student.

The last couple chapters describe his time under the Maharishee's tutelage as well as under one of the guru's most advanced students. The Maharishee is a sage the likes of which Brunton has not seen in all his travels. The guru has the humility to say that he cannot teach Brunton anything, but instead can only show him some things that he learned on his own journey.

In almost all cases, Brunton had to take great initiative and steer off the beaten path to find the true masters. On the other hand, most of the individuals who were easily found, and eager to talk, were just con men.

I recommend this book for those interested in development of the mind and body. Mar 01, Maria Carmo rated it it was amazing Shelves: A marvellous book, taking us by the hand through an India which had all sorts of contradictions, but also the best and more excellent Human Beings expressing the Wisdom of Perenial Philosophy. The search for truth and for a suitable, credible Teacher takes Paul Brunton, a Western skeptic, to a journey of Self discovery in which he learns to distinguish betwwen simple fakirs and really Holy Men, culminating with his realisation that Ramana Maharishi is the One who deserves to be recognised as a H A marvellous book, taking us by the hand through an India which had all sorts of contradictions, but also the best and more excellent Human Beings expressing the Wisdom of Perenial Philosophy.

The search for truth and for a suitable, credible Teacher takes Paul Brunton, a Western skeptic, to a journey of Self discovery in which he learns to distinguish betwwen simple fakirs and really Holy Men, culminating with his realisation that Ramana Maharishi is the One who deserves to be recognised as a Holy, Wise and transforming Guru - excatly because he respects his disciple's free will and discrimination.

He often teaches through silence, but can also use sparce words in order to get to Brunton's Soul and leave an indelible mark of LOVE nad Faith in him. A wonderful, almost pictorial book. Maria Carmo, Lisbon 18th. Augusr Oct 20, Lohit Namboodiri rated it really liked it.

The author beautifully describes his journey with a critical mindset. In this book, you will get introduced to Ramana Maharshi. The book has a lot of old English words which makes it a bit difficult to read.

In technical terms, I can call this as a survey paper on different Yogis of India in early 20th Century. Oct 17, Alina Lazarescu - Abboud rated it liked it. I absolutely loved his encounter with Maharishi and the days spent with him. This pages emanate such a special energy.

The rest of the book is interesting describing the author quest for true knowledge, for a true spiritual master in India. Oct 28, J. Nevertheless, there is a great deal of fascinating spiritual knowledge.

Some of the information jumps out at you and other you have to astute enough to see what it right in front of you. Apr 18, Ajitabh Pandey rated it it was amazing Shelves: Bruton has recorded his experiences while searching for a Guru Holy Teacher who can initiate him into Yoga. Its a marvolus account of how he travelled the whole country as a critical seaker and found some great Yogi's and spiritual teachers but could not accepet any of them as his Guru until he find Raman Maharshi.

My own Guru Pt. Sriram Sharma Acharya , who is the founder of All World Gayatri Parivar used to say, "when you are going out in the market to but vegitables etc you check thoroughly Bruton has recorded his experiences while searching for a Guru Holy Teacher who can initiate him into Yoga. Sriram Sharma Acharya , who is the founder of All World Gayatri Parivar used to say, "when you are going out in the market to but vegitables etc you check thoroughly for quality, so why can't you do the same when you go in search of a Guru".

The best part I like about Brunton is the critical questions he asked various spiritual leaders in order to test whether they are actually spiritual or merely taking advantage of the people in the name of religion. This is a great book which presents mutiple faces of India at those times and I would highly recommend it to all spiritual seekers. Jan 07, ainsley rated it liked it. What a long journey this book was. The author went up and down India, into jungles, across desserts, all in search of a rishee.

By the time he actually found the rishee, or Maharishee in this case, I was so tired of reading the book that I didn't even realize this was the big deal of the whole story! Additionally, each page was packed with such dense writing and descriptions that I had to read them over and over again sometimes.

But I did learn a lot about India and about the extensive search on What a long journey this book was. But I did learn a lot about India and about the extensive search one goes through, especially in , so find a yogi. And for that alone - that the author showed me how exhausting and extensive such a search is - I have to give the book 3 stars. But if you're looking for light, quick reading, this might not be the best choice Nov 26, Naliniprasad rated it it was amazing.

Read this book mentioned in a telugu biography of ramana maharshi. Paul brunton was one of the first westerners to give a first hand account of meeting the maharshi. He was drawn to the sage of arunachala just like the maharshi himself was drawn to the mountain shrine in his teenage. The book describes brunton's various encounters with Indian spiritual masters of the previous century. Must read book for any one interested in Spiritual masters of yester years. Oct 16, Bhashini rated it it was amazing Shelves: Paul Brunton's account of his search for genuine spirituality in s India was a delightful discovery for me.Chadwick reported that Ramana himself insisted upon this division.

Meher Baba made many references to Hitler and the Nazis, and Ott clarifies a number of points, including misconceptions. What is Theosophy 3. May 08, Justin rated it really liked it Shelves: Details if other: I like the writer's style of writing.

By the time he actually found the rishee, or Maharishee in this case, I was so tired of reading the book that I didn't even realize this was the big deal of the whole story! Death and Dying 3. But they both froze, Brunton's brown eyes locked into the pure oynx eyes of the reptile.

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